“TheCeļotājs” –
Liepāja City Sights in Courland
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Epilog –
Liepaja City Sights in Courland
 
Contents:
 
01. Sight around Liepaja –
02. Historical Landmarks in Liepaja –
03. Churches Cathedrals in Liepaja –
04. Cemeteries in Liepaja –
05. Monuments Memorials Statues in Liepaja –
06. Museums in Liepaja –
07. Parks and Gardens in Liepaja –
08. View of Liepaja from –
09. Liepaja Russian Tsar's era Fortifications –
10. Liepaja Russian Tsar's era Karosta Naval Port –
 
In conclusion to my visits and stay in the City of Liepaja, we will try to summarize the numerous places and sights we had visited and the sights the City of Liepaja has to offer one to see. Depending on your interest, there are many historical sights for everyone. Whether it is historical structures, old churches and cathedrals to old landmarks, there is something for all. There are even white sand beaches along the Baltic Sea where you can enjoy yourself to windsurfing and sail boating if this is you interest. For myself, I am interested in historical structures and landmarks, being the late 19th to the early 20th century history of Latvia and in some places I have went back even further to the 15th to 16th century. All this is just a small part of Latvia history and through out this site is what I have tried to covered, which is only part of the over all history of Latvia. During my stays in Liepaja I used a local guide who knew where the different places we wanted to visit and see. With out using a local guide, we would just being wandering around and not getting any were. So if are planning to visit Liepaja and see its historical sights, I highly recommend hiring a local guide that knows the area(s) you want to see.
 
To simplify things, as to just what is covered, we will break this all down by categorizes.
 
01. Sights around Liepaja;
 
Sights around Liepaja are general sights seen way walking around the different areas of Liepaja. During my first trip to Liepaja in 2011, each day we walked a different part of Liepaja were we saw different parts that are not on a tours radar. This is something we have done in the past with other towns and city in Latvia. I have found out that this is a good way to see how other Latvians daily lives are and just what condition they live in. This is norm to a general tourist, but I'm not what you would call a normal tourist. When I do a photo study of a town or city I do the tourist track first then I head off the track to see just how other people live and just what other parts of the town or city has to offer. For when one goes off the tourist seen, you will be surprised just what you may find and I have found many. For when visiting a town there is more to the town then what is listed in a tour guide.
 
Trying to explain everything that we seen during these nine days, during our first visit in 2011, during our general walks around Liepaja would fill a book. So we will simplify thing by covering the important areas or sights and let you visit each day yourself. During this first category we kind of jumped around as to the important sights seen. 
 
Oskara Kalpaka "Karosta Canal" Bridge – is one of the oldest Latvian and Liepaja metal bridges built in 1906, is a technical monument. The bridge was designed by French engineer Alexander Gustave Eiffel and constructed to these designs. Located between north Liepaja New Town and Karosta Naval Port and crosses the Karosta Canal. Before the Canal was spanned with the swing-bridge a steam ferry plied between the two banks “see the decent on the right from the bridge”.
 
It consists of two identical cropped spans, which each span turns 90 degrees on each side. The bridge was designed to use an electric winch to aid its operation and it takes 4-5 minutes to open and close. Over the life of the bridge it has been seriously damaged several times.
 
In 2006, the bridge’s northern part was damaged by a Georgia tanker flying the flag of "Anna." After the reconstruction Oscar Kalpaks Bridge works again today. Several times a day it is open to vessel traffic.
 
The Promenade along the Canal is located along the Tirdzniecības kanāls “Trade Canal" that runs from the Tram Bridge west to the western part of the port area and north to Lake Liepaja. In 1697-1703 the new Trade Channel was dug up and few years later the Līva River was filled up.
 
Liepājnieki “people from Liepaja” are quick to point out that this beautiful walkway along the canal was once off limits during Soviet Union times. Perhaps the temptation to set sail for Sweden frightened the local party bosses. Today, you can take a stroll and look at the ships and yachts moored here or take a tour of the harbor. Other sites of interest include a huge hourglass filled with amber instead of sand and a fountain that’s supposed to look like a wave. There are also pubs, shops, galleries and clubs along the Promenade. Also the Baltic Sea part of the Latvian Navy is located along this part of the canal. While walking west toward the sea and the mouth of the canal you can also see large sea going cargo ships as well as fishing boats.
 
Later on we were able to board  a Charter Boat and take a tour of both canals the Trade Canal and the Karosta Canals as well as the inter bay between each canal.
 
Liepaja Peters Market is located next to Kuršu Square and over 100 years has been the biggest market in Liepaja. The market's pavilion was first opened in 1910. The pavilion was designed by architect L. Melvils. The Market building was highly innovative for the time. Roof construction with large windows provided good light.
 
The architect's task was not easy - the market pavilion had to be built amongst the three churches, Saint Anne's Church in the east, Saint Josephs Cathedral in the west and a Synagogues that once was located south of Peters Market. The market pavilion is decorated with small towers at all four corners of the building. Liepaja Peters market is one of the most beautiful market stalls in Europe!
 
Nowadays trading at Liepaja Peters market is done in four pavilions, two sheds, numerous stalls and caravans, as well as a market square where tables overwhelmed by nature's bounty almost break. Peters market is expecting its costumers every day from 8:00 till 18:00, and until 14:00 on Sundays.
 
While walking through the market area, we can see a verity of items being sold. From fruits and vegetables to clothing and flowers to hardware and etc. As we go inside the pavilion we can see cases of meats, bread, pastries, dairy products and soda pop of different brand and flavors. One needs to remember this, that these are individual stalls owned and operated by individual people. It's not like going to a general super market where the super market is owned by a holding company. These people who own and operate these stalls, only make a living from what they sell. These types of markets and how they are operated date back to the beginning of time when farmers would bring their products to towns to be sold in open markets. Inside the pavilion market area is some what set up like Riga's Central Markets and other Latvia town and city markets but are on a much smaller scale then Riga's Market. The only different I saw was Liepaja pavilion area was setup to sell meats, bread, pastries, dairy products and soda pop of different brand and flavors that needs to be kept in coolers. There was some general merchandise stalls that sold general products that could not be outside. While visiting the outside area of the market area we looked at some of the merchandise they offered. Some of this merchandise is clothing, shoes, and etc. is imported from other countries and their prices are well with reason. They even sell CD's and DVD's be it music or movies. I was told by a friend in Liepaja, what you see here today may very well has been stolen yesterday or is pirated so one has to be very careful when purchasing and of these CD's or DVD's. You can find almost anything that one can find in a Shopping Mall.
As time went on, and people started traveling around the world, either by land or by sea, the world trade opened up, some of these items began being sold in specialty stores. But as for dairy products, eggs, meats, vegetables, fruits, and nuts were grown on farms and brought to the markets. Most people today only know of a super market and have never seem or visited an open air market place as can be found in other parts of the world. I can remember the Saturday Farmer's Markets, where people had gardens and brought their home grown products to these markets to be sold. With out telling my age, I can remember when bread was $.25 per loaf and it was even cut into slices. Meat was processed on site in the stores meat counter, hamburger was freshly ground right then or they had prepackaged meats and if you need it cut, they did it right there or one could go to a butcher shop and watch a side of beef or pork being cut up into what you wanted. These times are gone for ever thanks to big business and the need for big profits and mass production.
The Former Soviet Union era Children’s Home located at Eduarda Veidenbuma iela 10. Was used during the Soviet Union era second occupation, orphan children with no parents or family or that their parents or family members had been arrested, deported or were executed were placed in this building were they received indoctrination in the Stalin's Soviet Union Marxist–Lenin Socialist Communist theory ideology.
 
Lake Liepaja is located east of Old Town Centre. These pictures of Lake Liepaja were taken from a grassy area off Amatas iela 22, and from atop a concrete power tower base. 
 
Lake Liepaja “Latvian: Liepājas ezers” the fifth-largest lake in Latvia, located near Liepaja in Liepaja district. Total area of the lake; 37,15km2, length 16.2km, average depth 2.0m, coastal line length 44.6km.
 
Lake Liepaja is a pod-shaped shallow eutrophic coastal lake with extensive areas of emergent vegetation “Phragmites, Typha, Scirpus, Sparganium”, surrounded by seasonally flooded meadows and arable land. Polders and dams enclose most of the wetland area. In the lake are found 14 species of fish pike, roach, perch, bream, crucian carp, tench, eel, vimba, burbot, carp, zander, smelt, bitterling and rudd. In May only licensed fishing is allowed. Price of license is 10 LVL “about $20”. From 1977 till 1999 the lake was an ornithological preserve with 2 species of birds - swans and ducks. Since 2004 the lake is included in the European Union protected territories list Natura 2000. In 2008 the nature protection plan of Lake Liepaja was developed by Grontmij Carl Bro Company.
 
Islands;
 
Lake Liepaja has 13 islands, most notable from which are Atteku(-as), Zirgu, Pērkona, Putnu "kalva" and Cionas island. On the east bank of the lake is located Friča grove, on the west bank near Pērkone is located Reiņu Forest, Latvian: "Reiņu mežs".
 
History;
 
Historically the Lake Liepaja was connected with Lake Tosmare by the Vernen brook, but in the 20th century the brook was filled up. Later in the 20th century the Fortress Canal “Latvian: Cietokšņa kanāls, Melnupīte, Russian: Чёрная речка”, which connects the lake to the Lake Tosmare and the sea was dug up. In the second half of the 20th century the plant Liepājas Metalurgs built so called Golodov's Dam to separate the polluted part of the lake from the rest of the lake.
 
Lake Liepaja Peninsula – is a man made peninsula that juts into the north end of Lake Liepaja was made entirely of slag from the local steel mill. At the start of building of this peninsula, it was to be an earthen dam to block contaminates that could be found in the rain run off into the canal from the steel mill and other industry located in the area to hold it in a pool and not contaminate the rest of Lake Liepaja, but for some reason it was never finished. So today it is just a man made piece of land jutting into Lake Liepaja. Now that we have seen a man made peninsula, we will move into something of more interest.
 
Lake Liepaja Peninsula was made from slag being dumped there from the furnaces of "Sarkanais metalurgs". The slag that was skimmed from the top of the molten metal loaded into trucks and hauled to its current site. Today it is an abandoned area used only by fishermen and some partiers’ goers. 
 
If you does not know what slag is the Definition of Slag: A stony waste matter separated from metals during the smelting or refining of ore or steel. 
 
The Liepaja Sea Port “Free port of Liepaja Authority” This is a small part of the Liepaja Sea Port. A majority of it is a restricted area and one is not allowed to visit or photograph it today except from the channel, the breakwaters or from a charter boat.
 
Port History “Ostas vēsture”; 
 
Original settlement in the place of modern Liepaja was founded by Curonian fishermen and known by the name Lyva “from the name of river on which Liepaja was located”. The oldest written text mentioning the name is dated by the 4th of April, 1253. The Livonian Order under the aegis of the Teutonic Order established the settlement as the town of Libau in 1253. The name Liepaja began to increase in usage after 1560. In 1625 the Duke Friedrich Kettler of Courland granted the town city rights, which were affirmed by King Sigismund III of Poland in 1625.
 
Under Duke Jacob Kettler “Ruled 1640-1681”, Liepaja became one of the main ports of Courland as it reached the height of its prosperity. Jacob was an eager proponent of mercantilist ideas. Metalworking and ship building became much more developed and trading relations developed not only with nearby countries, but also with Britain, France, the Netherlands, and Portugal. Liepaja and Courland passed to the control of Imperial Russia in 1795 during the Partitions of Poland.
 
Growth during the nineteenth century was rapid. In the 1870s the rapid development of Russian railways and the 1876 opening of the Liepaja - Romni railway ensured that a large proportion of central Russian trade passed through Liepaja. By 1900, 7% of Russian exports were passing through Liepaja. The city became a major port of the Russian Empire on the Baltic Sea, as well as popular resort. By the orders of Alexander III, Liepaja was fortified against possible seaborne attacks. In the early 20th century on the northern edge of the city a major military base was established, including formidable seaside fortifications and quarters for extensive military personnel. As part of the military development a separate military port was excavated. This area became known as Karosta “War Port” and has served military needs throughout twentieth century.
 
Early in the twentieth century the port of Liepaja became a central point of embarkation for immigrants traveling to the United States. In 1906 a direct service to the United States was used by 40,000 migrants a year.
 
By the year 1913, 1738 ships entered Liepaja with 1,548,119 tones of cargo passing through the Port. The population had increased from 10,000 to over 100,000 in about 60 years.
 
During World War I Liepaja was occupied by the German Army. After the war, when the independent state of Latvia was founded, Liepaja became the capital of Latvia for six months when the interim government of Latvia fled
from Riga on a ship “Saratov”.
 
World War II devastated the city. The Soviet occupation of Latvia brought great misery with many thousands arrested and deported to Siberia and thousands fleeing to North America, Australia and Western Europe. During the Soviet occupation, Liepaja was a closed city and even nearby farmers and villagers needed a special permit to enter the city. The Soviet military set up its main Baltic naval base and closed it completely too commercial traffic in the late 1960s. One third of the city was occupied by the Soviet Naval Base with 26 thousand military staff.
 
After Latvia regained independence, Liepaja has worked hard to change from a military city into a modern port city marked on European maps. The commercial port was re-opened in 1991. In May 1994 the last Soviet Union troops left Liepaja.
 
Since then, Liepaja has engaged in international co-operation, has found more than 10 twin and partner cities and is an active partner in several co-operation networks. Facilities are being improved as the city hosts Latvia's largest naval fleet and is increasingly important to the NATO.
 
Today the Port of Liepaja looks very much like a construction site, new berths are being built and reconstructed, new infrastructure elements, such as railway and truck access roads are being built.
 
Port of Liepaja;
 
The Port of Liepaja provides a solid base for logistics connections with the rest of Europe. Latvia’s third largest port in terms of cargo throughput, Liepaja is truly multifunctional, as a port service provider, dealing with most types of cargo. The port infrastructure, access canals, berths and cargo-handling equipment, allows for vessels with a maximum draught of 9.5 meters and length of 225 meters to call at the port. In total, there are 16 cargo handling terminals for various types of cargo, equipped with appropriate cargo handling and storage facilities – open-air and warehouses, silos, tanks and refrigerated space.
 
Liepaja is geographically favorably situated in respect of Russia and other CIS countries, thus enabling cost effective shipping time. Liepaja is one of the few non freezing ports in the region, providing continuous navigation at any weather conditions. The Port is open and provides cargo handling and other port services 24 hours a day. State of the art technologies combined with highly qualified labor force ensure efficient performance of works at a high quality level. 
 
The Swan Pond Remnant of River Līva is located on the west side of Liepaja centre and between Hika iela and Vites iela.
 
Līva “German: Lyva, Lyua, Libau” was a famous river in Kurzeme in today Latvia. It was located between the Baltic Sea and Lake Liepaja and had a length about 6 kilometers and a width near the mouth about 50 meters. The source of the Līva was located in Lake Liepaja near the former Pērkone River. The place where Līva felt into the Baltic Sea was located approximately on the place of today Northern harbor in Liepaja. The river had one known island Perkunen “Latvian: Pērkona galva”, it was located near the source of the river. The Līva served as a water trade way to the Grobiņa via the Lake Liepaja and the port was located on it. The original suburb with a name Līva was located in the distance of about 1 kilometer from the mouth of the river on the both sides of it. The old name for the city Liepaja descent from the name of the river and for the centuries was associated with it. The part of the river near the mouth had become too shallow by the end of 15th century. In 16th century the first Līva channel was dug up between Līva and Baltic Sea with a length about 780 meters and a width of 50 meters. In 1697-1703 the new Trade channel was dug up and few years later the river was filled up.
 
The Stadium Daugava is located on the west side of Liepaja centre;
 
Stadium Daugava is a multi-purpose stadium in Liepaja, Latvia. It is currently used mostly for football matches and is the home stadium of FHK Liepājas Metalurgs. The stadium holds 5,083 people, and hosted the Baltic Cup 1992.
 
From 1925 to 1934 the stadium was named "Strādnieku stadionu" workers' stadium, from 1934 to 1990 "Pilsētas stadionu" town stadium.
 
The Liepaja Museum Courtyard Area located at Kūrmājas prospekts 16;
 
Liepaja Museum “Liepājas muzejs” is housed in a building which is itself an historical treasure, the museum has managed to maintain its original early 20thcentury interior. The ground floor displays Stone and Bronze Age artifacts unearthed at local archaeological sites, an excellent collection of weapons and jeweler recovered from a Viking settlement at Grobiņa and vintage memorabilia from both world wars. Paintings, ethnographic costumes, black and white photos and centuries-old bibles are also on display and a sculpture garden is also at your disposal outside.
 
History of the Liepaja Museum;
 
In the beginning of the 20th century two societies were engaged in collecting museum objects in Liepaja: the Liepaja Antiquity society created by the Germans in 1911 and the Liepaja Latvian society that in 1912 acquired an official permission for beginning of collecting objects for the future museum. When in 1922 the Kurzemes Museum society was established, it took the responsibility for doing everything in order to create a museum in Liepaja by uniting various societies’ funds.
 
The town museum was opened on the 30th November 1924. In 1935 the museum moved from its first dwelling in Jana Cakstes Square into the respectable edifice, built in 1901, at Kūrmājas Avenue 16, where it is situated to days.
 
The edifice was built by architect Paul Makss Berchi after Berlin architect Ernest von Ine’s sketches. A wide, inter-communicating hall with a gallery is the basis of the complicated configuration of the two-storied room construction. The hall’s interior stands out with its splendor, the gallery’s banisters are made in the shape of a sharp arch arcade, and sundries with consoles decorate the portals. The main entrance doors are a real masterpiece, a work of a high level of art. The mansion’s roof is rather unusual considering Latvian architecture, since it is made of ornamentally placed black and red tiles.
 
The Liepaja Museum’s creator and its manager during many years was pedagogue, artist and the folk art researcher Janis Sudmalis “1887 – 1984”.
 
These days the museum’s funds have over 100 000 objects, whereas in the museum halls Liepaja and Southern Kurzeme’s past is reflected in about 1500 exhibits: the history of Ancient times with unique archeological objects, the history of medieval towns and cities, time signs of the 19th – 20th centuries, Southern Kurzeme’s ethnography in the framework of human life, the life and creative work of sculptor Mikelis Pankoks.
 
One of the biggest exhibition halls is situated in the Liepaja Museum in which new art exhibitions can be attended frequently
Each time we visited Liepaja the museum was closed for reconstruction, so we were unable to view its collections of Liepaja history. So all we could see the statues located in its courtyard.
Liepaja Bus Station Railway Station and Railway Yard – Joint Stock Company Liepajas Autobusu Parks provides passenger road transportation services in Latvia. It operates city, region, and long-distance transportation services for public passengers, as well as for the organizers of tourism and excursions. The company also offers technical supply services for transport firms and bus terminal services, as well as room rental and bus rental services. In addition, it operates auto repair shops that offer repair services for bus and cargo automobile. Further, it operates gas filling stations, as well as provides bus cleaning services. The company was founded in 1945 and is based in Liepaja, Latvia.
 
Liepaja is the most important city and port after Riga, and has an advantage over Riga because its harbor is not ice-bound for part of the year. The Germans had altered the broad gauge line which runs from Riga through Jelgava, Gluda, and Renge, then dipping across the border to the Lithuanian town of Mazeikiai and up again to Latvia at Vainode, and so through Priekule to Liepaja. Other lines run south, from Jelgava and Priekule in Latvia, and from Mazeikiai in Lithuania. All had been altered to standard gauge. The line which strikes south from Jelgava, runs through Lithuania and connects with Berlin. The Latvians decided to leave these lines as they were, thus avoiding a break of gauge at frontier stations, since the Lithuanians have kept their lines altered from Russian to standard by the Germans to the standard gauge.
 
There still remained the necessity of ensuring through transit for goods between Russia and the ice-free port of Liepaja, so the Latvians built a broad gauge line. This runs parallel with the other line through Jelgava and on to Gluda, at which town it strikes off at a tangent to Liepaja, instead of dipping to the border. It is 143 miles long, and is the most important line built under the reconstruction program.
 
02. Historical Landmarks in Liepaja;
 
The House of Peter the 1st “Pēteris I namiņš” – ANNO 1697, one of the oldest dwelling houses in Liepaja is located at Kungu iela 24;
 
Not only is this charming house is one of Liepaja's oldest buildings, it also has the distinction of having hosted the Russian tsar on his trip to Western Europe in 1697. Coincidentally, the historic house is across the street from “Kungu 26 / Bāriņu 33” that now houses a weavers’ workshop was built only two years later and served as accommodation for King Charles XII of Sweden, the tsar’s rival during the Great Northern War “1699–1721”.
 
This wooden house has small paned windows and is opposite the junction at Kungu iela 24. In the 17th century it was a hotel run by Madam Hoyer, where the Russian Tsar Peter stayed in 1697. Probably the Tsar chose that hotel because it was the only hotel in Liepaja at that time with an inside toilet. The Tsar arrived in Liepaja incognito. Together with some other noble Russian young people he was traveling around Europe and stopped off in Liepaja as it was on his route. However this house is noted not only for its noble visitor but also as one of the oldest dwelling houses in Liepaja, a wooden log building on a low stone foundation with a steep tile roof.
Today it sets empty and awaits its further. With a little work, this historical house can be restored and made into a museum of the time period. Today, The House of Peter the 1st is owned by the City of Liepaja and waiting for its unknown further.
The Liepāja City Council Building - Former District court is located at Rožu iela 6;
 
Liepāja City Council is made up of fourteen deputies and a mayor make up the Liepāja City Council. City's voters select a new government every four years, in March. The Council selects from its members the Chairman of City Council “also called City Mayor”, the First Vice Chairperson and a Vice Chairperson “Deputy Mayors” which are full time positions. City Council also appoints the members of four standing committees, which prepare issues to be discussed in the Council meetings: Finance Committee; City Economy and Development Committee; Social Affairs, Health Care, Education and Public Order Committee; Culture and Sports Committee. The City of Liepāja had an operating budget of LVL 31 millions in 2006, more than half of which comes from income tax. Traditionally, political leanings in Liepāja have been right-wing, although only about 70% of city population has voting right. The Liepājas partija have dominated the polls.
 
The Liepaja Theatre “Liepājas teātris” is located at the corner of Teātra iela and Skolas iela; 
 
"Liepaja Theatre is a serious legacy to be proud everyone liepājnieks. As the oldest public theater Latvian Liepaja Theatre has a rich history, which many artists have created the legends of our time. These legends together with Liepāja name in no time and space constraints. They make attractive Liepaja's image, it calls for access to Liepaja, Liepaja Theatre, Liepaja.
 
Theatre's role is clearly paramount, because the theater is a mirror of our life ethics and the wonder of the creator, maintainer of the good faith and inspiration that so much is needed daily for every one of us.
 
Theatre is obliged to throw light on our nation's ethical and aesthetic values, closer to the people to meet and Liepaja Kurzeme professional theater arts, music and cultural functions of the Centre and help us to maintain optimism and confidence".
 
THEATRE VISION
 
We are loved at home and want to be recognized in Europe.
 
THEATRE MISSION
 
Professional Kurzeme regional musical drama theater with a permanent and highly skilled troupe that offers a diverse and artistically rich and high-quality repertoire of every inhabitant of the region of Kurzeme and art, music, theater and cultural center.
 
The Liepaja University is located at Liela iela 14;
 
Mission and constitution of Liepaja University.
 
Liepaja University is one of the universities of the Republic of Latvia. Liepaja University is a symbol of education, science and culture of Liepaja and Kurzeme region that provides with competitive, internationally recognized varied education. Developer’s innovative research ensures sustainability of society development, economic knowledge development in Latvia as a lawful partner in European Union.
 
The Hotel "Libava" is located at Vecā ostmala 29. This historic building, which was constructed in 1772 in the very heart of Liepaja, was used as a customs office for many years. Ships arrived here for customs controls through the Trade Canal which connects the Baltic Sea with Liepaja Lake. The beautiful building has undergone several reconstructions and has been used for different purposes over the years.
 
The Workers’ House was located here at the end of the 19th century but in the 1930s it housed a soup kitchen for the unemployed and served as a hiring point. The local sailors knew this place very well because the legendary bar At the Black Ball was located in the building towards the end of the 1930s. If the weather was bad or a storm was approaching a black ball was hung at the façade of the building. It was visible from a distance and warned the experienced seadogs of the danger. In such cases active sailing ceased in Liepaja but sailors and fishermen killed time in this popular place of entertainment. It should be added that high spirits also prevailed in the bar when the weather was fine.
 
During World War II the building was lucky not to suffer from German bombing. The same cannot be said about the neighborhood which was completely destroyed. During Soviet times the Liepaja City and District Division of the USSR Innovators and Rationalisers Association occupied the building. An exhibition hall, library and offices were also located there. At that time the building was called the Innovators Club. Later on the house was not appropriately managed and maintained for many years.
 
The fate of the building took a turn for the better in 2005. Its new owners did not try to save money on renovation. The flooded basement was drained and the old building revived. The house, which had played an important role in the history of Liepaja for more than two centuries, was given the old name of the sea city, Libava.
 
Architect Guntars Vīksna and interior designer Antra Blekte breathed new life into the building by combining the old and modern in a very elegant manner. Everything has been well considered right down to the last detail. The house,
equipped according to the latest design and technical standards, can boast fragments of its old brick walls. The compositional centre of the marble floor in the spacious hall is a “wind rose” made from wood. It graphically presents
the cardinal points and wind directions.
 
Jana iela is one of the oldest streets in Liepaja. Preserved along both sides of the street are 18th and 19th century wooden warehouses, once a very characteristic element of Liepāja as a commercial and port town. The warehouses are protected as nationally important monuments.
 
In the summer of 2004, the appearance of Jana iela changed. The historic cobbling was restored for a length of about 100 meters between Liela iela and Skolas iela, combined in an interesting pattern with metal slabs. Lighting is providing not only by lamps on decorative lampposts, but also by colored lights mounted at street level.
 
In the 1960s and 1970s, the street was the venue for exhibitions of art and photographs, the organizers striving to disregard Soviet ideological demands. Also located in Jana iela at this time was the famous “Vāgūzis” a building where poets, artists, musician, actors, journalists and other free thinking intellectuals’ of the time used to meet.
 
The recent improvements in the street have been designed by Liepāja architect Agris Pēdelis-Līnis.
 
The New Liepaja Fire Brigade's "Fire" Station is located in this historical red brick building with its equipment housed in an unattached brick four bay building with old wooden swing out doors. This being, once they receive an alarm, they have to run from the main building to this unattached building unlatch the wooden doors swing them out before they can leave. We were given the chance, we haven't yet meet a fireman who won't take the time to show off their equipment, to see the fire trucks and their equipment located within this building. As we entered the building you can see the fire trucks and their equipment that date back to the Soviet Union era. These three trucks are designed and equipped for off road use "all wheel drive" and are fitted with 2000 liter onboard water tanks. These trucks are also so equipped so they can also hook to an outside water source. 
 
Located at Flotes iela 3, is the former Great Emigrant House, which is now an abandoned building and in disrepair. It will or has been sold and most likely will be demolished. Once these building become abandoned, they become pray to scavengers who strip the building and steal anything that is of value. The land around the building is being used to store logs waiting to be exported.
It is unfortunate I was unable to find any history behind this building. It is located in New Town, abandoned with its history forever forgotten. When walking around New Town, I found more and more people know more about Old Town then they do about New Town because there is more history to Old Town then New Town since it is mostly industrial and that is not on their radar screen now days. My theory is this, every building has a history behind it. especially old structures of the past. Once you lose its history, it is lost for ever!
Located at Ezermalas iela 1, is the red brick Liepaja Locomotive Water Tower – ANNO unknown.... I am unable to find any further information or historical documentation information on this water tower.
This is another example of lost history, this tower was built for a reason and just what it was know ones knows. All they know it has always been there.
03. Churches Cathedrals in Liepaja;
 
There is 11 Churches and Cathedrals located through Liepaja. Some have long history behind them while others have history but it is not written. We will cover the ones that I have the history on them. For the other ones are not on a tours radar screen and you would have to look for them. I will mention then here and their location for reference to them.
 
Liepaja Holy Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Cathedral – ANNO 1742 – Exterior – Liela iela 9;
 
Liepaja Holy Trinity Lutheran Cathedral “Svētais Trīsvienības luterāņu katedrāle” ANNO 1742-1758 were you will not only see its exterior but also its breath taking interior located at Liela iela 9. 
 
Liepaja Holy Trinity Lutheran Cathedral is one of the most impressive historical building in the very heart if Liepaja. It is an outstanding construction art monument of the late baroque age which has not got anything similar like that in the whole Latvia sacral architecture. The church has been the dominant of the city since 1758 and it has served for the people of Liepaja as a place of a busy Lutheran church life. In the church the decision about the serfdom abolition in Courland was first announced in 1817. Today the Liepaja Holy Trinity Lutheran Cathedral is the Latvia Evangelical Lutheran Church Liepaja Bishop’s Cathedral and the Liepaja Holy Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church, the German Lutheran Church also works here.
 
The foundation stone of the Liepaja Holy Trinity Lutheran Cathedral was laid on 19 July 1742 and it was devoted to the Holy Trinity. The construction plans were prepared by the mason master Johann Christoph Dorn from Kaliningrad. The pilasters, cornices, window margins and portals were chiseled from the Gotland sandstone, but the façade of the building originally was built from yellow, small sized the so called Dutch bricks typical for Liepaja, which were painted in yellow.
 
The stone parts “pilasters, edges, portals and the balustrade” were painted in dark grey, almost black linseed oil paint. The Holy Trinity Cathedral was consecrated on 5 December 1785. The building was not quite finished then, the second floor of the tower was missing and the picturesque woodcarving setup, apart from the pulpit, was not gilded and painted yet. The half built tower remained like that till 1866, when more or less according to the original plan the third and fourth floors were erected from the metal constructions. The tower became nearly 55m high. In 1860 the façade of the building was plastered up by cement, thus the church got its usual “grey” image.
 
In 1865–1866, the building underwent its first major reconstruction the original draft tower was raised on the two upper floors to almost 55 meters high. In 1906, the church installed a clock mechanism. Several changes were also made to the sacristy behind the altar; a new one was added.
 
Liepaja Holy Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Cathedral – ANNO 1742 – Interior – Liela iela 9;
 
It is possible to see unique and original masterpieces in the Liepaja Holy Trinity Lutheran Cathedral that have been preserved up to today. Noteworthy just before the entrance into the cathedral there is the Liepaja Coat of Arms above the door aisle and the sculpture on the left side of the entrance. This is the symbol of Faith and it is depicted by a rococo style female image. The other sculpture is the symbol of Love, which has been dismantled and removed to the antechamber of the cathedral since 1996 when the restoration was done. This symbol like the symbol of Faith is depicted by a rococo female Image. 
 
There are two attractive medallions which are situated in the antechamber of the church. One of them is dedicated to the completion of the building construction on 17 October 1750.
 
It is written on the medallion “The iron block neither me nor plucked me for the God protected me”. The other medallion is dedicated to the completion of the tower construction in 1866.
 
In the congregation hall of the cathedral it is possible to see several unique pieced of art such as the altar, pulpit, confessional, the Duke’s box and the glamorous stained glass windows.
 
The altar of the Liepaja Holy Trinity Lutheran Cathedral is the biggest one in Latvia. Its decorative podium part is 13m high. The composition of the altar is made of 4 columns which support its upper part. In the center there is the Trinity which is adorned with an aureole under the baldachin. The altar sculptures are quite surprising with their high mastery and stylization brightness. The elegant postures of the Italian baroque sculptures and the carelessly fluttering cloaks are joined together thoughtfully with a sensitive realism in the depiction of the body parts.
 
On the left of the altar there is the pulpit. It was made in the 50s of the 18C and its author is the well known woodcarver J. Slavichek. In the composition of the pulpit there is something like a whorl. The stairs that lead up to the pulpit spiral round the column and in the podium of the pulpit they as if roll up into themselves. The edge of rge pulpit roof is decorated with small bells and angels who divide the 4 crowns of the continent. The pulpit gilding was done by the master J. Endress.
 
The confessional is made in the same style as the pulpit. It has got a firm construction. Visually it reminds of a huge glass case with gorgeous ornaments. The confessional has still got its original glazing and handle like a dolphin.
 
The Duke’s box was made in the 60s of the 18th Century in honor of the Courland Duke Ernst Johann von Biron. On top of the box in the Courland Coat of Arms there is included Biron’s Coat of Arms. The Duke’s box is famous for its sliding windows; the casements can be pulled up and fixed with special fastenings. The original glazing and the original button type handles, which are fixed into the casements, have also remained undamaged. 
 
The four stained glass windows of the eastern part of the façade inner windows are an absolutely unique interior supplement. They were made in 1870. The author of their sketches is Fredrick Gotlib Sperra, the painting teacher of Liepaja.
 
One of the biggest valuables of the church is the organ. The organ of Liepaja Holy Trinity Lutheran Cathedral is one of the most outstanding masterpieces in the world. It is famous for its size, history, visual image and musical quality. The new organ with 36 registers was finished at the same time when the church was built by the Courland Duke’s privileged organ maker Johan Heinrich Joachim. Unfortunately, the church was not satisfied with the organ for the organ maker was old and deaf and because of that the organ was not up to their expectations. In 1773 Heinrich Andreas Contius, one of the most important organ makers at the time was invited to Liepaja, after he had made successful the organ in Riga Saint Jacob’s Church. Contius’ organ was finished in 1779, it had 38 registers, and the people of Liepaja were finally happy with the organ. The construction of the organ went on till 1885 when Barnim Gruneberg from Stettin completed the extension of the organ and as the result now the organ had 131 independent parts and due to that it became the biggest organ in the world which is confirmed by a china plate above the 4th manual of the organ. The organ kept this status till 1912 when a bigger instrument was built in Michael’s Church in Hamburg. However, the status of the biggest manual organ in the world still belongs to the organ of the Liepaja Holy Trinity Lutheran Cathedral.
 
When going up to have a look at Liepaja from the bird’s eye view in the church tower, one attention is attracted by the clock mechanism and its dial which were mounted in 1906. 
 
The beautiful church has entertained every person of Liepaja and every guest of Liepaja for more the 250 years. People find peace and encouragement in it and they find their way to the God there. The Liepaja Holy Trinity Lutheran Cathedral is like a pearl in the heart of Liepaja.
 
Tours are offered around the cathedral and its 55 meter tower is said to offer scenic views of the city of Liepaja. The cathedral is also a major venue for concerts and exhibitions in the city and regularly hosts classical music concerts and arts displays.
 
“For a small fee, a man will take you up the 137 wooden stairs to the clock tower where you’re afforded an excellent view of the city. The climb is not for the “Faint of Heart”.
 
Saint Anne’s Evangelical Lutheran Church – ANNO 1508 – Eduarda Veidenbauma iela 1;
 
Saint Anne's Lutheran Church is the oldest church in the city, mentioned for the first time in documents from 1508, the church it self and the spire have been rebuilt several times. 
 
The author of the last reconstruction of the church in the 19th century is the best Liepaja's architect of all times, Max Paul Bertschy. One of the most precious valuables of the church is the altar created in 1697 by a wood-carver Nicolaus Söffrens. This 9.7m high and 5.8m wide baroque style masterpiece is one of the most outstanding examples of art from that period in Eastern Europe. Saint Anne's Church is also proud of the organ which was built according to the sketches of the outstanding Latvian composer Alfrēds Kalniņš and is the third largest church organ in Latvia, after those of Holy Trinity Cathedral in Liepaja and Riga's Dome Cathedral.
 
You can also climb the tower and have a panoramic view over Liepaja – Please Note: This has been unconfirmed at the time of our visit to Saint Anne's Lutheran Church, since they have signs posted NO Photographs in its entrance. Since, it is not open to the general public for tours.
One thing I have noticed while visiting other towns in Latvia is that the Lutheran Churches are closed to the general public and if you want to visit it interior arrangements must be made well in advance. Not so with the Catholic Churches, they are open to the general public daily and they also welcome photographing its interior. Even the Baptist Churches are willing to open there church to visitors and also welcome the photographing its interior. This is something that boggles my mind. The Russian Orthodox Churches are open to the general public but don't allow photographing its interior with out prier permission for the head of the Archdiocese, this due to their beliefs.
Saint Joseph’s Catholic Cathedral – ANNO 1894 – Rakstvežu iela 13;
 
Saint Joseph’s Catholic Cathedral “Svētais Jazepa katolu katedrale” – ANNO 1894, located at Rakstvežu iela 13, where we will see the exterior of Saint Joseph’s Catholic Cathedral, as well as it splendid interior décor.
 
This massive light yellow brick church next to Peter’s Market has an interesting history. The expanding 19th century congregation had outgrown its small building, but had been denied a building permit for a new church so they just added onto the existing one creating the towering structure you now see. The interior is ornately decorated with a variety of scenes from the Bible.
 
Liepaja Paul's Baptist Church – Kuršu iela 29;
 
Liepaja Paul's Baptist Church "Liepāja Baptistu Pāvila draudze baznīca" – ANNO 1895 that is located along Kuršu iela, where we will see the simple exterior as well as the interior décor of this fine old church.
 
The Church of Martin Luther of Jaunliepaja – ANNO 1914 – Jelgavas iela 62;
 
The cornerstone for the Church of Martin Luther of Jaunliepāja was laid on 18 May 1914. The architect was K. E. Štrandmanis. The building if the church took 20 years, the work was suspended several times. On 8 June 1934, the church was consecrated, but the building has not really been completed to this very day. The design included a small central tower that has not been put up. A balcony has been attached to all four of the walls of the major hall. On the balcony above the entrance is the organ, and opposite it is the choir loft. On either side, there are seats for visitors. A simple altar is at the center. The lighting element at the center of the church is shaped like a cross and grants the room a solemn mood.
 
The Cross Lutheran Church “Krusta luterānu baznīca”, is located at Krišjāna Valdemāra iela 7. It is a simple white constructed church with a very simple interior décor.
 
The Zion Baptist Church “Ciānas draudzes baptazis I N”, located on Lāčplēša iela is a simple light brown brick constructed church with a very simple interior décor.
 
Russian Orthodox Churches and Cathedrals; 
 
There are four Russian Orthodox Churches and Cathedrals located though Liepaja that serve it Russian speaking residents.
 
The most famous one is Saint Nicholas Maritime Orthodox Cathedral – ANNO 1903, located at Studentu rotas iela 7, Karosta; 
 
The Saint Nicholas Maritime Orthodox Cathedral is the visual and spiritual dominant of the whole Naval Port Area. The author of the design was the Saint Petersburg’s architect, academician V. Kosyakov and he was assisted by the architect A. Viksel. The executive artist and the author of the mosaics was V. Frolov, the wood carvings and gilding of the iconostas were made by P. Abosimov. The paintings of the central and the right-side alter spheres were produced by F. Railyan and the frescoes of the left-side altar spheres were painted by M. Vasilyev.
 
The construction cost were 0.53 million Russian Rubles, The Cathedral has been designed and erected in the style of the 17th century Russian Orthodox Churches with central and four side cupolas symbolizing Christ and Four Apostles. The central entrance with the two fold door of a filigree work resembles the gate of the Saint Sofia Cathedral in Kiev. Behind the front door there is another one, installed particularly to prevent the people in the church from draughts. The Finnish granite and sandstone were used in the exterior trimming; walls were brick laid of the Estonian yellow bricks. Subtle majolica “Windows” and mosaics add to the exterior. High above the western entrance, from the seaside, the Mosaic Iron of Christ, the Redeemer, is seen; beneath it, the icon of Saint Nicholas, the patron of seamen and travelers. The mosaic icons of the Virgin and Saint Alexander Nevsky were placed by the artist V. Frolov on the southern façade, of Christ, the Savior, on the eastern façade and of Saint Nicholas, the Miracle Worker and of Aleksey, the Russian Orthodox Church metropolitan, on the northern façade.
 
The Saint Nicholas Cathedral was designed for 1500 people.
 
The height of its cupola is 54 meters.
 
Drawing of the plans was started on 16 August 1899, when an agreement was signed between the chief construction of the Liepaja Naval Port I. A. Mac Donald and the academician V. Kosyakov of Saint Petersburg. Erection began in May 1901. On 4 June 1901, the Russian Tsar Nicholas Ii with his family members, court people and supreme officers took place in the solemn ceremony of construction of the foundation stone of the Cathedral. The walls were 12 meters high on that day. On 13 October 1902, the first bell was installed in the tower of the Cathedral. The first service in Saint Nicholas Cathedral and church consecration took place on 23 August 1903. Also in this ceremony, the Russian Tsar Nicholas II and his family and courtiers took place. In 1905, from Liepaja Naval Port to the Far East to Russian, Japanese War went Pacific Ocean Squadron II. In the Church, services for officers and sailors, they were praying for mariners’ fortune.
 
Upon the outbreak of World War I, numerous items were evacuated to Russia including the bell and icons and the values that had been left were pillaged by the German occupiers. During the 1920s and 1930s, under the Latvian Government, the Church was adapted to the needs of the Liepaja Garrison Lutherans.
 
Finally, upon conclusion of World War II, the Soviet Naval Base in Liepaja was made a secret territory and was closed to the public. So they established a sports hall, a cinema and the so-called “Red Corner”, a recreation and entertainment room, here in the former Cathedral for the needs of the sailors and soldiers. It was then that the sphere of the central cupola was bricked up in order to avoid the great acoustics and let the navy people listen to the films. The Cathedral does not have any more the marvelous mosaic floor of stone tiles that it used to have before, although the side altar wall-paintings are still under redecoration.
 
All the four facades of the Cathedral are of significant architectonic and artistic value. Their frontons contain reproductions of the canonized Saint of the Orthodox Church, as well as inscriptions in the Church Slav language and orthography.
The West façade central stairs: The Holy Christ Savior’s icon and text.
 
The East façade: The Virgin’s icon and text.
 
The South façade: The Virgin’s icon and Orthodox Church Saint Alexander Nevsky icon and text.
 
The North façade: Saint Nicholas Wonderworker’s icon and metropolitan’s Saint Aleksey’s icon and text, who was premier in Russia during the church building.
The memorial of an anchor that is located on the cathedral's grounds is dedicated to those sailors who were killed during The Russo-Japanese War "8 February 1904 – 5 September 1905" was "the first great war of the 20th century.
 
While I was there its exterior was still under repair, which has been an ongoing thing since the Soviets left in May 1994.
 
Holy Trinity Orthodox Cathedral is located at Bāriņu iela 7A;
 
Saint Aleksandra Ņevska Orthodox Church – ANNO 1891 is located at Uliha iela 61;
 
Saint Alekseja Holy Orthodox Church is located at Rīgas iela 54;
 
04. Cemeteries in Liepaja;
 
There are seven cemeteries located through out Liepaja and I can only guess there ages. Since some of the headstone are so faded due to age and the elements has worn off and date may have been on them, as well I have seen some headstones with either no date or it is either Russian or Hebrew to which I can't read. So we will try and estimate the cemeteries age by what I have been able to see or read. Since cemeteries don't have a written history as to when it was establish all we can do is go from there.
 
Līvas “Cemetery” kapsēta  is located in the south part of Liepaja Old Town along Cenkones iela 29 is the oldest cemetery in Liepaja;
 
As we enter the main entrance of Līvas kapsēta we see a dome chapel and to its left is a crypt. As we pan from the left to the right, we see well maintain graves. As we continue our walk through Līvas kapsēta, we can see even many more well maintained graves. Also you will see the graves of the pastors who came from Germany to bless the kapsēta in the early 1900’s. One being Pastor Rudolf Schoen 1847–1912 and the other pastor was Pastor prim. Eugen Kluge 1848–1920. While we were visiting Līvas kapsēta we had the pleaser of having a guided walk through Līvas kapsēta by Mareks Fūrmanis Līvas kapsēta Caretaker. Mr. Mareks Fūrmanis even took the time to show us the inside of the chapel and it history during the Nazi Occupation.
 
Located in the center of the chapel is a screw mechanism that lowers a coffin to the cellar of this chapel where there are located a number of burial vaults, that are still occupied today. Note: Due to Cemetery Rules, pictures of this cellar, the vaults or this screw mechanism were not allowed. 
There is a rumor that during the Nazi occupation, a Jewish family hid in the caller of this chapel and only came out at night to get food and water until the Soviet Red Army liberated Liepaja.
Liepaja Jewish Cemetery; 
 
The Liepaja Jewish Cemetery is located at the south end of Līvas Cemetery and dates back to the late 19th to early 20th century. A majority part of the graves date back to Pre World War II and World War II. There is a newer part to this cemetery, located at the far west end of the cemetery. This little section has newer grave plots that date from the mid 20th to the early 21st century. Some of the dates range from 1970 to 2003 and the newest one is 2010.
 
Also located in the front part of the Jewish Cemetery is two memorial dedicated to those who were murdered by the Nazi Army during the first months of their occupation of Liepaja. The first one is dedicated to Victims of the Rainis Park Massacre, there are Gravestone for 37 Jews “including 3 unknown ones” who were executed in Rainis Park on 03 July 1941 by SS-Einsatzkommando 1a under Reichert and reburied in the Jewish Cemetery several days later. 
 
The need for this second memorial and newest one became evident in 1998 when it was learned that the names of most Liepaja Holocaust victims had been forgotten. Although Yad Vashem "Jerusalem" had since 1953 collected victims’ names from survivors, only 20% of the names from Latvia had been recovered, and there was little hope of getting additional names. As only 2% of Latvian Jews had survived the German occupation, many Liepaja Jewish families and their friends were totally annihilated in the Holocaust, leaving nobody to remember their names. Such oblivion would have pleased Hitler. 
 
For the next 3 years and aided by Juris Dubrovskis in Riga, a search of dozens of archival sources in five countries for Jews who lived in Liepaja on the eve of the Holocaust. Ella Barkan in Tel Aviv provided invaluable help by interviewing survivors. A memorial book with 7,060 names was published in 2001. The complete database was posted on the Internet, enabling people to check for errors and omissions. The current list, posted on the Memorial Wall, includes 6,428 names of the victims of Hitler and Stalin. That is at least 93% of the total.
 
With helped from Ella Barkan and Solomon Feigerson, plans for a Memorial Wall in the Jewish Cemetery in Liepaja was started. The Wall was strictly a grass-roots effort, without any help or support by organizations or governments. However, a gratefully acknowledge contributions by the City of Liepaja toward renovation of the cemetery. The memorial was designed by Alzhaana grafikas un dizaina birojs “Liepāja” and was built by UPTK Liepāja.
 
One cannot revive the victims of the Holocaust or even provide them a decent burial. As a symbolic gesture, sand from the Šķēde Dunes Mass Graves was buried at the foot of the Memorial; it probably contains a few atoms of the victims. In a more visible tribute we have brought their names to the cemetery, where most victims would have found their final resting place if there had been "No War", "No Holocaust", and "No Gulag".
 
Victims of the Raiņa Park Massacre, there are Gravestone for 37 Jewish victims “including 3 unknown ones” who were executed in Raiņa Park on 03 July 1941 by SS-Einsatzkommando 1a under Reichert and reburied in the Jewish Cemetery several days later. The Soviet inscription says: "Eternal Glory to the Heroes Who Fell in the Battles for our Soviet Fatherland". "True, many were members of the paramilitary "Workers' Guard", but they were arrested and shot, not killed in combat".
 
The first murder operation took place on the first day of occupation, on 3rd and 4th of July 1941, when the Einsaztkommando shot a group of Jews along with other Latvian activists and Red Army POW’s in the anti-tank ditches in Raiņa Park. The killings were carried out by Einsatzkommando 1a, under the command of SS-Obersturmfuhrer Fritz Reichert. Groups of victims “according to different sources, between 33 and 150 men” that apparently comprised of Jews and suspected political activists and Red Army POW’s were ordered to march in line along Brīvības iela to the two ditches previously dug by the Red Army, 100 and 200 meters in length, where they were shot. A few days later, they were reburied in the Jewish Cemetery. This memorial located in the Jewish Cemetery has the names of those shot in Raiņa Park. There is a memorial stone in Raiņa Park dedicated to those who where murdered there.
 
Centrālie Cemetery “Centrālie kapsēta” is located at Klaipēdas iela 83;
 
The Centrālie Cemetery “Centrālie kapsēta” located in the southern most part of Liepaja Old Town is located along Klalpēdas iela and is Liepaja largest cemetery. 
 
As we enter one of the side entrances to Centrālie Cemetery “Centrālie kapsēta” and walk through Centrālie Cemetery we can see many well maintained graves. As we get ready to leave Centrālie Cemetery through the main entrance we will see three memorials dedicated to; 
 
The Centrālie Cemetery being the larges cemetery in Liepaja and I s the newest one. The areas we were in had headstones that date back to the late 19th to 20th century. Some of the headstones that we saw had dates back to 1899, but a lot of the headstones have no dates on them at all.  So only one can go from there.
 
Liepaja Soviet Union World War II Military Cemetery is located at Klaipedas iela 85 and at the south end of Centrālie Cemetery; 
 
Liepaja Soviet Union World War II Military Cemetery is located at the south end of Centralie Cemetery, This war cemetery contains the graves of 498 Soviet soldiers and officers. They fell in 1941 or 1945 during fighting for Liepaja. Among the dead is Soviet Major General N.A. Dadaeva "7.11.1897 - 25.6.1941", commander of the 67th Infantry Division. He is buried in an individual grave.
 
The 67th Rifle Division was an infantry division of the Red Army. The 20th Rifle Division "territorial defense" was formed from militia brigades in the Leningrad Military District in 1923. On 21 May 1936 it was named the 67th Rifle Division. In June 1941, was part of the 27th Army in the Baltic Military District. After being badly battered during the early part of Operation Barbarossa, it was disbanded 19 September 1941.
 
Re-formed in September 1941. Fought on Finnish front. With 14th Army in northern Norway May 1945.
 
In 1957, it became the 116th Motor Rifle Division, but was then disbanded in 1960. For some part of the postwar period it was part of the 6th Army Soviet Union.  
Unfortunate this is all the information we have on this Soviet Union Military Cemetery since everything is in Russian and I don't read or speak Russian and one would have to talk to an Russian of that time. Since I have been  photographing World War II Cemeteries as I learn about them I just happen to stumbled across this one since it is not listed anywhere as some of the other ones are. This also happened to me while visiting Aizpute and Saldus, Latvia. These military cemeteries maybe small, but they should never be forgotten. In fact while on my way to Liepaja from Riga and returning to Riga we came across other military cemeteries that are not listed anywhere. If I hadn't been looking for things of interest, we would have missed them. Like I have said before, they stick them in the ground and then forgotten them. In fact the attitude to some is oh well, there is so many and we don't have the time to list them all. No comment! I guess that is why when I find them, I photograph them and log there location and then publish them. The only Soviet Union Military Cemetery that I have found listed is the Priekule Russian World War II Military Cemetery – "The Soviet Warrior's Cemetery" Lat: N56.43184, Lon: E021.59525 Brāļu kapi, Priekules parish, LV-3434, Latvia, located along Route P114. What blowed my mine was, the reception center was closed when we were there. Guess they only open it on 9 May the Russian Victory Day.....
Old Liepaja Cemetery “Old Liepāja kapsēta”;
 
The Old Liepaja Cemetery “Old Liepāja kapsēta” is located on both sides of Kaiju iela in Liepaja New Town.
 
Old Liepaja Cemetery is divided into two parts with the newer part located on the north side of Kaiju iela and the older part located on the south side of Kaiju iela. As we enter the main entrance of Old Liepaja Cemetery located on the south side of Kaiju iela we can see that the front part of Old Liepaja Cemetery is well maintained. As we move towards the rear of the cemetery the area is less maintained and the graves are much older and the headstones are falling over or have been vandalized. Still moving toward the rear of the cemetery we can see weeds covering the graves. Located in the rear of the cemetery we can see many graves that are dug inside the hillside. Located in this area is the graves of the World War II German Soldiers that were killed or died during the war are to be buried. With all the weed covered graves and unmaintained graves, it is hard to locate them.
This cemetery dates back to the early 19th to mid 19th century. The old section is in such poor shape and the headstones are or have fallen over it is hard to pen point it heritage. It has been reported that World War I and World War II German Soldiers are buried there, but one only knows where since nothing is marked. I now after visiting the New Liepaja Northern Cemetery is more in line as to where these soldiers are buried and not in this location, but again one only knows.
New Liepaja "Northern Cemetery" is located at Oskara Kalpaka iela 87;
 
Located in New Liepaja and on the west side of New Liepaja is the North Cemetery. It is a mixed ethnic cemetery and dates back to the late 19th to the early 20th century. As we walk through the cemetery, we can see neat and well kept grave sties and headstones. Also located in the cemetery are many monuments and graves dedicated to World War I, like the one at the entrance to this cemetery. One thing I noticed, as I have in so many other cemeteries I have visited while traveling through Latvia, the soil is made up of sand or very sandy soil. Some of the grave sites are quite simple, while others are very elaborate with a lot of marble outlining the grave plot. In Latvia, the grave sites are maintained by the deceased love ones or their relatives. When there is no one left to maintain them, the graves sites become in disrepair. What I can't or don't understand, I am unable to fine any written history on these memorials or their grave sites, it is like they are forgotten. To me, it's like stick them in the ground place a marker over them and then just move on. If there is any recorded history on them, I have been unable to find any one who can tell me........
 
This cemetery dates back to late 19th to early 20th century. Here it is hard to tell since a lot of  the headstones don't have dates on them. Guess one has to guess when a person died. And some of them are in Russian, which has a calendar of there owe and one I still haven't figured it out. 
 
Located with in the Northern Cemetery are four monuments that date back to World War I and World War II. The large German World War I Monument also has 10 headstones and graves of fallen soldiers. The monument has an Iron Cross on it with a date of 1914, which was when the German Army occupied Liepaja. There is also a Soviet Union World War II Monument with the dates 1941-1945. I'm not able to tell if there are graves next to it or around it due to the weeds around it. There is another Russian Monument with the dates if 1914-1918 on it. Here again we are unable to see any graves around it. But one has to guess there are. There is another Monument that is Latvian with the date 1919 on it and has six headstones and graves off to the side of it. Again one has to remember that these grave sites are maintained by their serving spouse or relatives and once they are gone, the grave sites become over grown with weeds since there is no one to care for them.
 
Liepaja Karosta Garnizona “kapsēta” Cemetery is located at Ģenerāļa Baloža iela 37B;
 
This cemetery is located at the corner of Laboratorijas iela and Ģenerāļa Baloža iela in the northeast part of Karosta. Garnizona “kapsēta” Cemetery dates from the late 19th century to early 20th century. It is a public cemetery with not only civilians buried there, but also Latvian and Russian Soldiers are buried here both from World War I and World War II. In the center rear of the cemetery is a monument dedicated to the Soviet Soldiers who died during World War II. The main Liepaja Soviet Union World War II Military Cemetery is located in the south part of Liepaja Old Town at the south end of Centrālie “kapsēta”  Cemetery at Lat: N56.48062, Lon: E021.00903, Klaipedas iela 85, Liepaja, LV-3416. 
 
Also in this cemetery there are 11 Soviet Soldiers that are buried in a collective grave.
 
05. Monuments Memorials Statues in Liepaja;
 
Anthem of Liepaja Monuments located along Kūrmājas prospekts 5; 
 
The Anthem of Liepaja Monuments that are located through out the city. Bronze street sculptures are placed all along Kūrmājas Prospect.
 
Raiņa Park Memorial Stone is located at the north end of Raina Park at Zemnieku iela 29;
 
Raiņa Park the site of the June 1941 Mass Murders and its Memorial located at the north end of the Raiņa Park.
 
The first murder operation took place on the first day of occupation, on 3 and 4 July 1941, when the Einsaztkommando shot a group of Jewish victims along with other Latvian activists and Red Army POW’s in the anti-tank ditches
in Rainis Park. The killings were carried out by Einsatzkommando 1a, under the command of SS-Obersturmfuhrer Fritz Reichert. Groups of victims “according to different sources, between 33 and 150 men” that apparently comprised of Jewish and suspected political activists and Red Army POW’s were ordered to march in line along Brīvības iela to the two ditches previously dug by the Red Army, 100 and 200 meters in length, where they were shot.
 
There are different estimates of the total number of victims that varies from several dozen to about 300. The Soviet Extraordinary State Commission investigating Nazi crimes noted that “is seemingly exaggerated” 1,430 people were killed in Raiņa Park.
 
Jewish Reburial Site and Memorial is located at Cenkones iela 39, in the Jewish Cemetery across from the Jewish World War II Memorial Wall;
 
This Memorial with the Victims Names and their finial Burial Site of the victims of those who were murders in Raina Park.
 
Located in the Jewish Cemetery section is the memorial and graves to the Victims of the Raiņa Park Massacre, there are Gravestone for 37 Jewish victims “including 3 unknown ones” who were executed in Raina Park on 03 and 4th of July 1941 by SS-Einsatzkommando 1a under Reichert and reburied in the Jewish Cemetery several days later. The Soviet inscription says: "Eternal Glory to the Heroes Who Fell in the Battles for our Soviet Fatherland". True, many were members of the paramilitary "Workers' Guard", but they were arrested and shot, not killed in combat.
 
The first murder operation took place on the first day of occupation, on 3rd and 4th of July 1941, when the Einsaztkommando shot a group of Jewish victims along with other Latvian activists and Red Army POW’s in the anti-tank ditches in Raina Park. The killings were carried out by Einsatzkommando 1a, under the command of SS-Obersturmfuhrer Fritz Reichert. Groups of victims “according to different sources, between 33 and 150 men” that apparently comprised of Jewish and suspected political activists and Red Army POW’s were ordered to march in line along Brīvības iela to the two ditches previously dug by the Red Army, 100 and 200 meters in length, where they were shot. A few days later, they were reburied in the Jewish Cemetery. This memorial located in the Jewish Cemetery has the names of those shot in Raina Park. Located at the north end of Raina Park at the site of the 3rd and 4th of July 1941 mass murders is a memorial stone in Raina Park dedicated to those who where murdered there. 
 
Jewish World War II Memorial Wall is located at Cenkones iela 39, in the Jewish Cemetery across from the Jewish Reburial Site and Memorial;
 
The Jewish World War II Memorial Wall is located in the front part of the Jewish Cemetery dedicated to those who were murdered during World War II by both Hitler's Nazi Army and victims of Stalin's NKVD in June 1941.
 
The need for this second memorial and newest one became evident in 1998 when it was learned that the names of most Liepaja Holocaust victims had been forgotten. Although Yad Vashem "Jerusalem" had since 1953 collected victims’ names from survivors, only 20% of the names from Latvia had been recovered, and there was little hope of getting additional names. As only 2% of Latvian Jewish people had survived the German occupation, many Liepaja Jewish families and their friends were totally annihilated in the Holocaust, leaving nobody to remember their names. Such oblivion would have pleased Hitler.
 
For the next 3 years and aided by Juris Dubrovskis in Riga, a search of dozens of archival sources in five countries for Jewish people who lived in Liepaja on the eve of the Holocaust. Ella Barkan in Tel Aviv provided invaluable help by interviewing survivors. A memorial book with 7,060 names was published in 2001. The complete database was posted on the Internet, enabling people to check for errors and omissions. The current list, posted on the Memorial Wall, includes 6,428 names of the victims of Hitler and Stalin. That is at least 93% of the total.
 
With helped from Ella Barkan and Solomon Feigerson, plans for a Memorial Wall in the Jewish Cemetery in Liepaja was started. The Wall was strictly a grass-roots effort, without any help or support by organizations or governments. However, a gratefully acknowledge contributions by the City of Liepaja toward renovation of the cemetery. The memorial was designed by Alzhaana grafikas un dizaina birojs “Liepāja” and was built by UPTK Liepāja.
 
One cannot revive the victims of the Holocaust or even provide them a decent burial. As a symbolic gesture, sand from the Šķēde Dunes Mass Graves was buried at the foot of the Memorial; it probably contains a few atoms of the victims. In a more visible tribute we have brought their names to the cemetery, where most victims would have found their final resting place if there had been "No War", "No Holocaust", and "No Gulag". 
 
Jewish Memorial in Šķēde Dunes is located at Lībiešu iela 33;
 
Located along the path leading to the Jewish and Soviet Union Memorials, is a small memorial plaque is dedicated to the some 3000 plus anti-Nazi and non-Jews of the total people who where murdered here.
 
Located in this area of Šķēde Dunes is the largest areas of mass murder sites in Liepaja that took place between 1941–1942, which is located fifteen kilometer north of the City of Liepaja and about a kilometer from the road that leads toward the sea, and leads to the Šķēde Dunes which is located along the Baltic Sea Coast line.
 
As you arrive in the parking lot and follow the path that leads to the mass killing fields and the Jewish Šķēde Dunes Memorial, located on the right side of the path there is a small memorial plaque dedicated to the some 3000 plus anti-Nazi and non-Jews of the total people who where murdered here. Moving up the path you will come to the Jewish Memorial, which is in the shape of a Jewish "Hanukkah”. The total number of people who were murdered at this location differs from one account to another”. Located north of the Jewish Memorial is the Soviet Union Memorial. Starting at the south end of the woods, as you look north from the sea side of the memorial is the start of the mass murder trench lines and continue through the woods to the north of the woods along the dunes. The grassy area just in front of the Jewish Memorial is the area that the Jewish victims that were to be shot were held before being taken to the trench lines and shot.
 
In contrast to most other Holocaust murders in Latvia, the killings at Liepaja were done in open places. About 5,000 of the 5,700 Jewish people trapped in Liepaja were shot, most of them in 1941. The killings occurred at a variety of places within and outside of the city, including Raina Park in the city center, and areas near the harbor, the Olympic Stadium, and the lighthouse. The largest massacre, of 2731 Jewish victims, and 23 communists, happened from 15th to the 17th of December 1941, in the Dunes near Šķēde, an old Latvian army training ground. More is known about the killing of the Jewish people of Liepaja than in any other city in Latvia except for Riga. 
 
Soviet Union Memorial in Šķēde Dunes is located at Lībiešu iela 37/53;  
 
The Soviet Union Memorial located in Šķēde Dunes and located just north of the Jewish Memorial is also dedicated to those that were murdered in this location between 1941–1942 in the Šķēde Dunes. Even though it does not name the Jewish victims by name, it is dedicated to all those who were murdered here during this period of time.  Inscribed in the front of this Soviet Union Memorial is these words;
 
Šķēde Dunes – Site of the 1941–1942 Mass Murder Graves Trench Lines is located at Lībiešu iela 37/53;
 
Located in this area is the Site of the 1941–1942 Mass Murder Graves Trench Lines that are located in the Šķēde Dunes along the Baltic Sea Coast line, is located some fifteen kilometers north of the city and about a kilometer from the road towards the sea. These mass murders began as early as July 1941.
 
Located just north of the Jewish Memorial and starting at the south end of the woods and the beginning of the tree line between the Baltic Sea Coast line “Dunes” and the Soviet Union Monument and working our way north through the woods to the open area some 1250 meters north of the woods and from the start 1650 meters. We will try and give one a general idea of the area where these mass graves and their trench lines lay. Here again, since there are no markers showing the exact locations of these mass graves are, all one can do is showing their rough locations. As we move north through the woods and the open area of the dunes, we will pan the area where the GPR "Ground Penetrating Radar" Satellite Map shows where these mass graves trench lines are located. 
 
Authors Note:
Before we start exploring the area of these Mass Murder Graves Trench Lines where these mass graves are located, I want to remind everyone that it has been 71 years since these mass murders took place and during this length of time the elements and the environmental changes to the dunes that have taken place since the mass murders took place, how the dunes looked then and how it looks today is very different. With the many years of Baltic Sea storms and high winds and every changing movement of the dunes sand, the outline of the mass graves are hard to define as to their exact locations are. If it had not been for a GPR “Ground Penetrating Radar” Satellite Map made by Prof. Valdis Seglin's' and Drs. A. Kukela and G. Sic'ovs from Latvia University at the request of Edward Anders and Vladimir Ban, of the "Jews in Liepaja Latvia" project, the exact location and outline of the mass graves would never be known of found. Thank you gentlemen for you hard work and dedication to this project. "May these mass grave locations never be lost nor forgotten again"! 
In contrast to most other Holocaust murders in Latvia, the killings at Liepaja were done in open places. About 5,000 of the 5,700 Jewish people trapped in Liepaja were shot, most of them in July 1941. The killings occurred at a variety of places within and outside of the city, including Raina Park in the city center, and areas near the harbor, the Olympic Stadium, and the lighthouse. The largest massacre, of 2731 Jewish, and 23 Soviet Communists, happened from 15th to the 17th of December 1941, in the Šķēde Dunes, near an old Latvian army training ground. More is known about the killing of the Jewish people of Liepaja than in any other city in Latvia except for Riga.
 
Šķēde Dunes is the largest of the mass murder sites located in Liepaja during the first year of the Nazi Army occupation of Liepaja, these mass murders which took place during July 1941 through December 1942. Located along the path leading to the Jewish Memorial and the entrance to the Šķēde Dunes Area, we will see a memorial to the 3000 anti–Nazi and non–Jewish of the 7500 that were murdered in the dunes. Located in the grassy area is the Jewish Memorial dedicated to the Liepaja Jewish victims that were murdered in the Šķēde Dunes and just north of this memorial there is also the Soviet Unions Memorial to those murdered along the dunes location. Even though it does not name the Jewish victims by name, it is dedicated to all those who were murdered here during this period of time.
 
These murders in the Šķēde Dunes began as early as July 1941 where some 200 Jewish people were murdered there. During a three-day massacre on 15-17 December 1941, German and Latvian units killed 2,749 Jewish people, more than half of Liepaja's Jewish population. Preparations for the operation began some days before. On 13 December 1941, Liepaja Police Chief Obersturmbannfuehrer Fritz Diedrich placed an announcement in the Latvian newspaper Kurzemes Vards stating that Jewish people were forbidden to leave their living quarters on Monday, 15 December and Tuesday, 16 December 1941.
 
On the night of 13 December 1941, Latvian police forces began to arrest Liepaja's Jewish people not yet concentrated in the ghetto. These victims were then brought to this "Courtyard, located at Lat: N56.50838, Lon: E021.00422, Tiesu iela 5, Liepaja, Latvia", where Jewish victims of all ages were crammed into the courtyard. The Jewish victims were ordered to stand with their faces towards the wall, and warned not to move or look around for relatives or at the watchmen. Some were transported to Šķēde on the evening of the following day and crowded into a barn “a wooden structure, described also as a garage”. Today these structures are no longer there. There is traces of something have been in the area, but due to the length of time, it is hard to say exactly what they were, but there is signs of some kind of structure(s) were in the area. Where it is from this time period or from something during the Soviet Union time.
 
Authors Note:
While spending sometime in Liepaja and talking to many Liepaja residents, none of them can remember or verify that this location was ever a Women's Prison. During this time period  prier to 1941-1945 and currently to date, there has only been two Women's Prisons in Liepaja. The old one which is now closed and its current one which is located on the corner of Ganību iela and Dārza iela – and neither one was ever located at this location. As to where anyone ever came up with the idea that is location was ever a Women's Prison, I have not been able to verify it with any of the people who lists it as a prison.
In the early morning of 15 December 1941, a column of victims was driven from Liepaja by Latvian policemen, under the supervision of the German SD, to the same barn in Šķēde where Jewish people from the prison had been taken. They were taken in groups of twenty to a site forty to fifty meters to a deep ditch dug in the dunes nearby, parallel to the shore. The ditch was about three meters wide and 100 meters long. There they were forced to lie face down on the ground. Groups of ten were then ordered to stand up and, apart from the children, to undress, at first to their underwear and then, when taken near the ditch, undress completely. They were shot by a German unit, the Latvian SD Platoon headed by Lt. Peteris Galins, and a Latvian Schutzmannschaften team.
The Baltic Sea was the last thing the Jewish and non–Jewish victims seen before being shot in the back!
During the murder operation, the Jewish people were placed along the side of the ditch nearest the sea, facing the water. The killing  squad was positioned across the ditch, with two marksmen shooting at the same victim. Children who could walk were treated as adults, but babies were held by their mothers and killed with them. A “kicker” rolled in those corpses that did not fall directly into the ditch. After each volley, a German SD man stepped into the ditch to inspect the bodies and if any signs of life were found, they delivered “insurance” shots. 
 
Their clothes were piled in piles after being forced to undress completely nude and then taken away by German military trucks. During the murder operation, Strott and another officer, Erich Handke, took pictures with a Minox, and senior Wehrmacht and navy officers visited the site.
 
The murder operations in Šķēde continued until December 1942. On 15 February 1942, the Germans planned to murder 500 Jewish people in Šķēde. However, on the way to the murder site a group of 22 Jewish victims pounced on the drunken Latvian guards and managed to escape.
In order to try to hide these mass murders in 1943, the German SD poured chlorine over the corpse’s buried in the mass graves.
Monument to Defenders of Liepaja 1941 is located at Jaunā ostmala 7/9;
 
The Monument to Defenders of Liepaja 1941 that is located along Jaunā ostmala is dedicated to those who fought against the invading Nazi Army in June of 1941.
 
Monument to the Sailors and Fishermen lost at Sea is located at Peldu iela 61;
 
The Monument to the Sailors and Fishermen lost at Sea “Latvian: Piemineklis bojā gājušajiem jūrniekiem un zvejniekiem” located at the west end of Kurmajas prospects and at the Baltic Sea coastline just off the beach is a notable modern monument and sightseeing place in Liepāja, Latvia.
 
The monument was built in 1977 by architect Gunārs Asaris and sculptor Alberts Terpilovskis with funding from LBORF and the fishing kolhoz Boļševiks. The monument is located on the shore of the Baltic Sea in the Liepāja seaside park, at the end of Kūrmājas Prospect. The monument consists of a bronze figure of the woman on 11 meter high V-shaped pedestal, sheathed by Saaremaa dolomite.
 
On 8 April 2000 a memorial plate dedicated to the American pilots whose aircraft was brought down on 8 April 1950 by the USSR Air Forces near Liepāja was added to the pedestal of the monument. 
 
The Monument in pop culture
 
This monument in Liepāja often is called "Crocodile" “Latvian: Krokodils, Russian: Крокодил”, because of a resemblance to Crocodile Gena from the Soviet cartoon. The inner part of the pedestal is a popular place for taking photographs. A poem in Russian language about the monument was written in 2005 by an unknown author.
 
Monument to Evalds Rimbenieks is located at Uliha iela 39/41;
 
This is a rough Google Translation from a Latvian Transcript; 
 
The Monument to Evalds Rimbenieks former mayor of Liepaja. Evalds Rimbenieks was a significant public figure, a priest and teacher Evald Rimbenieks is one of the finest of his time in Liepaja personalities. Latvian independence during the first Evalds Rimbenieks Liepaja was the mayor twice, from 1922 to 1928 and from 1934 to 1940. He took over the city after the war destroyed the farm, knew how to organize and especially to do a lot of culture. Liepaja today can celebrate with gratitude Rimbenieku that the city was founded in the People's Conservatory, opened in Liepaja Philharmonic and Opera, and founded the People's Conservatory of Arts and Crafts School, opened in the city museum, many sports and cultural associations, the Northern Cemetery open architecture created by Mr. Pants Latvian fights for the fallen warrior monument. She discovered during shipping from Liepaja and Tallinn and Saint  Petersburg, built in
Liepaja-Grobina highway, opened direct rail link to Liepaja, Berlin, open regular air service from Riga to Liepaja, in city street construction and pārbruģēšana etc. Evalds Rimbenieks were deported and died in the Gulag camps in 1944.
 
Lots of power and energy devoted to Latvian Liepaja and prosperity, he went through a serious national mortality. Evalds Rimbenieks head of the city of residence Uliha / Witte Street, moved to his estate symposium River Street. Next followed his arrest deportation to the Vyatka corrective labor camp Evalds Rimbenieka crime was his social and political life, but the main thing that he has been a municipal manager. Evalds Rimbenieks died in 1944, 15th January.
 
Monument to Mirdza Ķempe is located at Uliha iela 42 and Peldu iela;
 
Mirdza Ķempe “real surname Naikovska, Russian: Найковская” “9 February [O.S. 27 January] 1907, Liepaja - 12 April 1974, Riga” was a noted Latvian poet and translator.
 
Mirdza Ķempe was born into a working class family in Liepaja, Latvia. From 1914 to 1926 she lived in Tosmare at Ģenerāļa Baloža iela 47; later she and her family lived at Bernatu iela 41 in Liepaja. In 1915-1919 she studied at the 1st Liepaja primary school “now the 5th Liepaja school”. Ķempe graduated from the 1st Liepaja secondary school in 1925. Her first verse "Ne jums!" was published in the "Kurzemes Vārds" newspaper in 1923. In the same year she translated Pushkin's Mozart and Salieri into the Latvian language. In 1927 she entered the Latvian University in Riga. Because of lack of money she had to drop out of the university and in 1928 Ķempe started to work as an continuity announcer for Rīgas radiofons. In 1931 she married writer Eriks Ādamsons.
 
She translated works from Russian, English, German, Spanish and French. During the World War II she was evacuated to Moscow, Astrakhan and Ivanovo. She wrote plays, lyric miniatures and verses.
 
She was awarded State Prize of Latvian SSR “1958”, USSR State Prize “1967” and the Order of the Red Banner of Labor. In 1971 she received Visva-Bharati University honorary doctor diploma for her works on Urdu language.
 
On 9 February 1989 a monument to Mirdza Ķempe was opened in Liepaja “architect Ligita Ulmane”, another in Riga A iela in Ezerkrasts is named after her.
 
Liepaja Amber Clock is located a Dzirnavu iela 2; 
 
The Liepaja Amber Clock located at the north end of Hotel Promenade and along the Promenade “Canal”.
 
Liepaja, Amber clock and beads In 2003 during the celebration of the 750th anniversary of the Liva village, which was the start of Liepaja, the citizens and the visitors of the city donated pieces of amber of various size  more than 50 liters of amber were collected! The bigger pieces were threaded into 123m  long beads and the rest were used for making a 4 meter tall sun dial, which was erected on the promenade along the Tirdniecibas "Trade" Canal.
 
1st Rock Café Guitar and Walk of Fame is located at Stendera iela 18/20;
 
Latvia's first local in the wake of the legendary Hard Rock cafes. Behind the curved glass facade, everything revolves around local and international rock music, many stars of the Latvian scene donated personal items for the facility. In the summer it is open around the clock. You can eat well here too. Located at Stendera 18/20, Phone +371 634 81555. 
 
Walk of Fame is located along Zivju iela. Although not quite as impressive as the one in Hollywood, this Walk of Fame boasts the hand prints of Latvia’s most renowned rock and folk musicians and is appropriately located next to Latvia’s 1st Rock Café
 
Monument and Cemetery to “Latvia in 1919 Fallen Heroes Killed” is located at Oskara Kalpaka iela 87; 
 
Located at the entrance to New Liepaja Northern Cemetery is the monument and grave site of those who had been killed during the 1919 Latvian War of Independence.
 
The Latvian War of Independence, sometimes called the Latvian War of Liberation, Latvian: Latvijas brīvības cīņas, literally, the "Struggles for Latvia's freedom," or Latvijas atbrīvošanas karš, "War of Latvian Liberation", was a series of military conflicts in Latvia between 5 December 1918, after the Republic of Latvia proclaimed its independence, and the signing of the Treaty of Riga between the Republic of Latvia and the Russian SFSR on 11 August 1920. 
 
The war involved Latvia "its provisional government was supported by Estonia, Poland, and the Western Allies, particularly the United Kingdom" against the Russian SFSR and the Bolsheviks' short-lived Latvian Socialist Soviet Republic. Germany and the Baltic nobility added a new level of intrigue, initially being nominally allied to the Nationalist/Allied force, but attempting to jockey for German domination of Latvia. Eventually, the tensions flared up after a German coup against the Latvian government and led to open war.
 
Following a ceasefire, the Germans developed a ploy, nominally dissolving into the West Russian Volunteer Army led by general Pavel Bermont-Avalov. The West Russian Volunteer Army included Germans and former Russian prisoners of war nominally allied with the White Army in the Russian Civil War, but both Bermondt-Avalov and von der Goltz were more interested in eliminating the nationalists than fighting the Bolsheviks. Certain episodes of the Latvian Independence War are therefore also considered by Polish historians to be a part of the Polish-Soviet War particularly the "Battle of Daugavpils".
 
Soviet Union Memorial to Soviet Soldiers who Defended Liepaja in 1941-1945 is located at 14. novembra bulvāris 40A;
 
The Soviet Union Memorial to Soviet Soldiers who Defended Liepaja in 1941-1945 is located at the end of the road leading to the Middle Fortifications. This memorial is dedicated to the Soviet Union Soldiers who bravely defended Liepaja in 1941 against the invading German army. It is a simple memorial picturing three rod iron figures, a Soviet Union soldier, a civilian man and woman. In front of the memorial is a dish which was once the eternal flame during the Soviet Union Occupation. Today it is not used. 
 
06. Museums in Liepaja;
 
Liepaja Under the Regimes of Occupation is located at Klāva Ukstiņa iela 7/9; 
 
The Liepaja Under the Regimes of Occupation “Liepāja okupaciju rezimos” museum is located at Klāva Ukstina 7/9 is a two story red brick building. All the exhibitions are located on the first floor taking up four rooms. Located in the hallway is the Mass Deportations Wall of Remembrance to those who were deported from the Liepaja Area both in 14 June 1941 and again in 25 March 1949. This Wall of Remembrance has lists of Names of those who were deported with stats of each person or family that were deported. 
 
Liepaja Under the Regimes of Occupation “Liepāja okupaciju rezimos” not unlike the one in Riga, although on a much smaller scale, this museum traces the bloody history of both the Soviet and Nazi occupation of Latvia and the direct effect on Liepaja. Exhibits illustrate how the Soviets ‘held elections’ which included only one party, the communist party, and how attempts by local Latvians to create an opposition ballot only led to a swift death. It also shows the genocide committed against the Jewish population, the deportations of Latvians to Siberia and, later, the creation of the independence movement in the 1980s. Sadly the exhibits aren’t available yet in English. Soviet gulag survivors meet upstairs.
 
The Occupational Regimes;
 
The museum’s department “Liepaja during the occupational regimes” was opened on the 21st January 2001. Its mission is to maintain collective historic memory of the nation in order to strengthen its national self-consciousness, which is state system’s ideological and emotional basis, while recounting historic questions considering the loss of state system and occupational period. This department is situated in the building that during the Awaking period used to be the lodging of the Latvian National Front in Liepaja Klāva Ukstina iela 7/9.
 
The basic layout reflects the influence of international treaties of 1939 “Molotov-Ribentrop Pact and the USSR and Latvia’s mutual help treaty” on the Liepāja region socially politic, economic and cultural life – repatriation of german-baltics, the events of 1940-1942, the beginning of the soviet occupational regime, socially economic transformations and changes, Liepāja during the Second World War, the repeated soviet occupation, deportations of 1941 and 1949, gulag, the Third Awaking, including the period of time from 1939 till 1991.
 
1941 and 1949 Mass Deportations Wall of Remembrance; 
 
This exhibit is located in the main hallway of the exhibition part of the Liepaja Under the Regimes of Occupation “Liepāja okupaciju rezimos” Museum and is dedicated to those Latvian’s who were deported in 14 June 1941 and 25 March 1949. This exhibition has lists of those who were deported where they were deported and when and their status.
 
1941 Mass Deportations Wall of Remembrance –
 
The first section shows those deported on 14 June 1941 the names, date of birth, address lived at, the gulag or forced labor camp sent to and when they died.
 
These lists are by provinces located around Liepaja with a total number deported from each province. Like 527 Latvian people who were deported from the City of Liepaja on the 14 June 1941. 
 
1949 Mass Deportations Wall of Remembrance –
 
The second section shows those deported on 25 March 1949 the names, date of birth, address lived at, the gulag or forced labor camp sent to and when they died.
 
These lists are by provinces located around Liepaja with a total number deported from each province. Again like 204 Latvian people who were deported from the City of Liepaja on the 25 March 1949.
 
For further information on these lists and if any of your family members or your relatives are included on one or more of these lists please contact the museum. These lists are in Latvian only along with any information about them. Tel. +371 3420274, Email: info@liepajasmuzejs.lv.
 
Liepaja Old Fishermen Museum is located at Vecā ostmala 55;
 
The Liepaja Old Fishermen Museum is located at the west end of the port on Vecā ostmala and standing alone in the middle of the pier area is a single brick mason covered build were one can find the Liepaja Old Fishermen Museum. 
 
As we enter the main and only entrance to the Liepaja Old Fishermen Museum one will see old fishing gear, nets, straw reed netting fishing traps, there is even an old dugout canoe.  As we walk through the museum we can see an example of an 18th century wooden setting. Moving on, we can see a model of a woman repairing fishing net. We can see another example of fishing traps and nets. Located in the center of the room you will see examples of old oil lanterns, there is also models of fishing trawler. Also located on the table is an example of a old Livs Village.
 
This is a small museum and is not on any tour guide book. The only way we found it was by accident when we was walking along the Trade Canal. In fact, we saw a warehouse door open and just happened to look through the door when the man that was in attendant invited me in to view the exhibits. These exhibits are from the early fishing time when fishing was all done by hand with nets and traps. If one can remember that far back. It is a time of the 18th to 20th century when everything was totally done by hand from small fishing boats, if you know just what I mean.
 
Liepāja Metalurgs Museum is located at Brīvības iela 93; 
 
The Liepaja Metalurgs Museum, located next door to the main office of Liepaja Metalurgs at Brīvības iela 93. 
 
Liepaja Metalurgs, the only metallurgical company in the Baltic States and the biggest processing company in Latvia, leading its history since 1882. The enterprise manufactures low carbon and low alloyed steel products, including reinforcing bars, steel wire, nails and castings.
 
Foundry production includes different products of cast iron, steel, bronze and brass:
  • cast iron manhole hatches for telephone ductwork, the average service life of the hatches is minimum 20 years;
  • cast iron mooring posts for installation on the berthing structures, the average service life of the mooring posts is minimum 25 years;
  • grey cast iron yacht keels, weight 1025 - 1035kg, length 3550mm, width 200mm, height 380mm;
  • bells of bronze and steel;
  • other types of castings.
This is a small museum that is all about the companies history through time and just products they made. It consists of a few rooms that take you through it's history and shows pictures of these different time periods along with exhibits of their products. At the end of viewing the exhibits you are give a chance to watch a movie on how they take an old boat anchor and run it through the process to turn it in to reinforcing rods for construction and etc.
 
Karosta Navel Port Prison and Museum is located at Invalīdu iela 4;
 
The Karosta Navel Port Prison and Museum as we are given a guided tour of the of Karosta Navel Port Prison “Please Note: Only Guided Tours are Available”, Karosta Navel Port Prison is located at Invalīdu iela 4 in Karosta which was the former Secret Soviet Navel Base during the Soviet Occupation. 
 
The Naval Port Prison or Guardhouse; the building was erected about 1900 and until 1997 it served as a place where military persons served their terms for breach of discipline. From the very first years of its existence, it was a place to break people’s lives and suppress their free will. As powers replaced one another, its prisoners changed as well: they included revolutionaries, seamen and non-commissioned officers of the tsarist army, deserters from the German Wehrmacht, and enemies of the people in the Stalinist era, soldiers of both the Soviet army and the Latvian army and other rebels. The newest inscriptions on the cell walls by inmates date to fairly recently, 1997. Mysterious and inexplicable things have been noticed in the guardhouse: the rapping of footsteps, electrical bulbs that unscrew themselves, unaccounted for opening of closed cell doors. Yet encountering seeming apparitions in the prison halls has come as the most unpleasant surprise to many a visitor.
 
The ominous brick building has however been witness to some ghastly crimes over the past century. Originally built as an infirmary in 1900, it was used as a military prison by a long succession of regimes including the Soviets, Nazis and most recently, the Latvians. Indeed, the last prisoner was detained here as recently as 1997, a disturbing thought once you’ve seen the frightening scenes inside. Although the Nazis sentenced ‘criminals’ such as Latvian deserters to death here and executed them outside in the yard, the post-independence Latvian military mostly imprisoned barroom brawlers, drunks and seamen who went AWOL and then usually only for a few days. 
 
A tour of the building will reveal the horrible life lived by the inmates and the graffiti they left behind. Above the door in the solitary confinement cell is a cryptic message: “izeja no elles” or "exit from hell".
 
Guides are also happy to tell you the tale of the ghost that haunts the prison and how doors often swing open by themselves, how light bulbs screw out of their sockets and how visitors and staff have felt the disturbing cold of a presence not of this earth. The haunting was even investigated in an episode of the Sci-Fi Channel’s Ghost Hunters International. They claimed it was one of the most active locations they had ever visited.
 
Visitors can take a simple tour with a guide or participate in a reality show in “English” or “German”, spend the night in a cell or do the ultimate and become a prisoner for the night including regular bed checks, verbal abuse by guards in period uniforms and experience the horrors of using the latrine “see website for details”. For participatory events you must call ahead and reserve a time.
 
The haunting was even investigated in an episode of the Sci-Fi Channel’s Ghost Hunters International. They claimed it was one of the most active locations they had ever visited. This quote is something I am not going to touch. These things may or may not be true or may or may not be happening. For no where do they explain or even go into at what time of the day these Phenomena or strange things are happening or should we say take place. For I have not read about this anywhere else when researching the Karosta Prison. It only appears on their website and who knows! I am not going to say that they are not happening! 
 
07. Parks and Gardens in Liepaja; 
 
Raina Park is located at Brīvības iela 18/24; 
 
The Raiņa Park located between Brīvības iela and Zemnieka iela in Liepaja New Town. It is a large grassy tree filled area. At the north end of the park is the monument to those Latvian and Russian POWs who were massacred there in July 1941 by the invading Nazi Army and buried in the Red Army tank traps and later dug up and reburied in the Jewish Cemetery located in the south end of Līvas kapsēta “Cemetery” Liepaja Old Town. 
 
Rose Square “Rožu laukums” located in the heart of Old Liepaja Rožu laukums 9; 
 
Although the square is adjacent to the Tourist Information Centre, it is a popular spot to congregate this is the undisputed heart of Liepaja. It gained its name in 1910 when the city fathers decided to plant 500 rose bushes here. Walk in any direction from here and there’ll be something interesting to see or do. The sister city plaques that are found around the wall are not just plaques, each one is pointed in the direct of the sister city.
 
There are other parks located through Liepaja, but we didn't take the time to visit them.
 
08. View of Liepaja from;
 
View of Liepaja Skyline from Holy Trinity Cathedral Bell Tower;
 
For those who want a view of the City of Liepaja skyline, one can climb the 137 wooden steps that leads to Liepaja Holy Trinity Lutheran Cathedral bell tower, which is the highest point in Liepaja.
 
In 1865–1866, the building underwent its first major reconstruction the original draft tower was raised on the two upper floors to almost 55 meters high. In 1906, the church installed a clock mechanism.
 
As we climb the 137 wooden steps, that dates back to 1865–1866, inside the bell tower leading to the top floor and the door leading to the balcony that in circles the outside the bell tower.
 
As we look out over the city we can see the tram bridge and panning from the left to the right, we can see the eastern part of the canal and a smoke stack of a factory. Moving on to the right we can see a modern building being remodeled and other structures some old and others newer ones. As we move to the right we can see Saint Anna’s Lutheran Church in the back ground. As we still move on to the right we see a view of Līelā iela and Liepaja University. As we look west, we can see more old structures and in the far back ground, we can see the Baltic Sea. As we move on to the right we can see the canal and its sea port and view of New Town. 
Since this bell tower is the only highest point in Liepaja, and if you want a skyline view of Liepaja one must climb these 137 wooden steps. The only problem is this bell tower is only 55 meters "180.45 feet high, which is not quite high enough to get a complete view of the city. But one has to work with what you have at hand at the time. 
View of Liepaja Tirdzniecibas kanals “Trade Canal” from Tramvaja tilts “Tram Bridge” is located at Jūras iela 6; 
 
Standing on the pedestrian walkway in the middle of Tramvaja tilts "Tram Bridge" and looking out toward the canal you can get a clear view of Liepaja Tirdzniecibas kanals “Trade Canal”. 
 
As we stand on the east side of Tram Bridge looking northeast and panning from the left to the right we see the canal concrete wall and a full view of the canal. Panning to the right, we see the rear of Hotel Libava to the south view of the canal and its concrete wall. Moving to the west side of the Tram Bridge, we will see the south end of the bridge. Panning to the right we will see the south side if the canal and its concrete wall and boat docks. As we pan to the right we can see the rear of the Swedbank and Hotel Promenade, which was a former warehouse remodeled into its present state and hotel. Panning further to the right we see a full view of the western part of the canal and the ports. Panning all the way to the right, we can see the north end of the Tram Bridge.
 
View of Karosta Canal from Oskars Kalpaks "tilts" "Bridge" is located at Oskara Kalpaka iela 125; 
 
Standing on the pedestrian walkway in the middle of Oskars Kalpaks Bridge and looking out toward the canal entrance you can get a clear view of Karostas kanāls “Karosta Canal” and its entrance breakwaters. Oskars Kalpaks Bridge is located between Liepaja New Town and Karosta Naval Port and crosses the Karostas kanāls.
 
As we stand on the west side of the Oskars Kalpaks tilts and panning from the south end of the bridge and panning from left to right we see the south side of the canal and its concrete wall and breakwaters and the control tower for the bridge. As we pan right we see the canal’s shoreline and a communication tower. Panning further to the right we see the entrance to the harbor and breakwaters on either side of the entrance to the canal. Panning further right, we see the north side of the canal and the north end of the bridge. Moving to the east side of the bridge, we can see the north side of the canal and its concrete wall and breakwaters. Panning further right we can see a full view of the east part of the canal and the ports. As we pan more to the right we see the south side of the canal and its shoreline. As we pan further right we see a boat landing and a concrete boat moorings.
 
History of Karostas kanāls “Karosta Canal”;
 
Karostas kanāls “Karosta Canal” is a man made canal and the building of the canal was started in May 1894 during Russian Emperor Tsar Alexander III Reign and was finished during Russian Emperor Tsar Nicholas II Reign.
 
The Canal of the Liepaja Naval Port is a hydro technical construction that plays the key role in its life. It connects the internal roads, the shipyard and the depot basin of the naval ships. The plan of the Canal was drawn up by Russian military engineers P. Boreisha “1859-?”, S. Maksimovitch “1861-?”, S. Redko, V. Veselov and by the civil engineer F. Edelheim “1949-1921”. Construction was carried out under superintendence of the Chief Contractor I. A. MacDonald “1850-1906 and this deputy I. Korsakevitch “1849-?”. 
 
In May 1894, the construction works began and was completed in 1901. Floating ground suckers, steam dredges were widely used. The biggest ones, “Kronshtadt” and Saint Petersburg”, were built in France Marsseilles” and their capacity was 60 cubic fathoms “271.m3” per hour.
 
Before the Canal was spanned with the swing-bridge a steam ferry plied between the two banks “one can see the decent on the right from the bridge”. In the northeastern part of the Canal, a basin for ships and submarines was arranged. It comprised two dry docks and a floating dock. All of them still operate today as a part of the Liepaja Shipyard “Tosmare”. On the opposite side of the Canal a heavy oil base and coal sites were erected. Construction of these structure units were carried out simultaneously with the Canal erection, as part of a complex plan. All this was designed for a Russian Tsar's Submarine Base including a storehouse for naval mines. Later in 1932, the Liepaja Sugar Plant was built in the area making use of some of these naval structure units. 
 
The diggers found enormous amounts of dolomite rock, therefore the direction of Karosta Canal is slightly turned to the right from the East direction which was planned at the beginning. The Canal is 3.5km long and its width is 150 meters at the head and 250 meters at the eastern end. The average depth of the canal-bed is 9 meters. The project for the Canal and reservoir was to locate here 96 Battleships and 50 Carriers, almost all of the Russian Tsar's Baltic Fleet. 
 
The breakwaters at the Canal entrance were also erected within the united construction plan. The length of the Northern Breakwater is 358.2 meters and of the southern 507.6 meters. At first, while the canal dredging was going on, the breakwaters were used as interim harbor piers. People called them “the New Holland”. Stone blocks from Finland, bricks from the Lox Brickyards in Estonia, cement barrels from Germany, wood and construction equipment were discharged here. When the construction of the Canal was completed the breakwaters became merely walls built out into the sea to protect the shore and the canal entrance of sand silts and the front harbor’s heavy waves.
 
09. Liepaja Russian Tsar's era Fortifications;
 
The Northern Fortification Line of the Liepaja "Fortress" Fortification, 1894–1903; 
 
According to the intention of the Russian Army and Navy Headquarters, the Naval Port of Liepaja had to be provided with safe cover from the land and the sea to ensure protection in case of probable enemy’s attack. Therefore the outer fortification system for the naval base was erected during 1893 – 1906. The line girt the whole city. 
 
The strongest positions’ main constructor, engineer I. A. McDonald and artillery Colonel N. Bubnov have planned in the North of Liepaja next to the Baltic Sea. The common project for this fortress was made by war engineer, Lieutenant General D. S. Zabotkin, 1837-1894. Four of eight large caliber cannon Batteries “Batterie” – fr. Fire unit or tactical unit, place for the cannon were built here. This cannon line had to secure the city port from the sea side. Each of the batteries was designed as a part of the gunnery complex and as a separate opposition unit as well. In case of battle every cannon battery was meant for using it as a complex and also for self-governing defense unit. The land border of the fortress, too, was secured by eight big and middle caliber gun batteries. Open and closed artillery positions were arranged between the Liepaja Lake and the Tosmare Lake. The Northern Battery No. 1, the Redan [“Redan” – fr. a triangle fortification unit, having guns stationed on both the outsides], the Lunette of the northern fortifications [“Lunette” – fr. an assailable from rear field fortification unit], the right and left redoubt [“Retoute” – fr. a fortification including wall and moat] and the three floating gun batteries [i.e built on massive wooden platforms, have not remained today] in the Liepaja Lake were the most significant ones. They have not survived till nowadays. 
 
A sophisticated infrastructure was created in the rear of the fortification system. A 600 mm wide railway was built along the inner side of the fortification line. This was designed to provide ammunition, water, extra forces and mobile connections. Seventeen locomotives ran along the fortress railway. And the action of this railway was provided by special fortress railway battalion soldiers.
 
In close distance from the batteries, quarters/barracks were built for the soldiers of the artillery batteries. In general those were timber barracks built using horizontal beam manner. Separate, luxuriant house was made for commander of each battery.
 
Exactness of the gunfire was detected by vertical and horizontal range-finder sentries. Aiming and shooting was guided from special turrets jointly, as well as from the command post of each of the batteries separately. Today, you can still see the distance-gauges in either of the batteries: semicircle structures, partly underground, partly over-ground, provided with a long and narrow vision-slit to watch the enemy. 
 
Connections between the positions were to be supplied by means of a telegraph, as well as special soldiers “signal providers” and homing pigeons.
 
There were several artillery gunpowder cellars built inside the fortress circle and the capacity of each of them was as much as 16 thousand poods “1 pood is – 16kg” for a total of “256,000kg” or 35.274 pounds for a total of “564384 pounds”. Although after the plan 185 cannons in coast fortification and 452 cannons and mortars in the terrestrial fortification had to be placed, there were less then a half of this amount in the batteries till the day of dissolution of for tress.
 
The Liepaja fortress was liquidated in November 1908. Part of the cannons were dismounted and brought to the Kaunas fortress in Lithuania, another part was melted or left in the port to be used as polers “slabs on the shore for vessel towing”. They attempted to blast the gun batteries, the underground structures and the gunpowder depots but did not succeed efficiently.
 
So today we can still see the remains of the newest and the most up-to-date- fortress of the Tsar’s Russia.
 
Battery Nr. 1, the Northern Coast and the Land Artillery Stands;
 
The fortification system was built up as a combined lunette of coast artillery and repulsing front land offensive. The fortifications were erected during 1896 – 1902, made of German cement that was brought by Russia and in barrels, delivered to the Liepaja Port. There were concrete basements for cannon gunpowder at the back of this battery, in the swamp next to Viestura iela.
 
The main authors for project of battery No. 1 are Colonel N. Bubnoy and engineer Captain A. Židkov 1859-1932. The northern fortification line played a strategic role as it covered access to the city from the Šķēdes Road and blocked up almost 2.5 kilometers wide area between the Baltic Sea and the Tosmare Lake. Including the coastal defense system, it disposed the armament consisting of 27 big caliber “6’-8’ and 20 small caliber 57 mm” guns. The defense structures were built up along the little Šķēdes Stream in form of extended open gun stands. The river was excavated and the left winger shore became the fortification escarpment [“Escarpe” – fr. the slop of the inner rampart of the outward moat”’. To provide effective cover for the Šķēde Road and for the bridge across the river, there were two ravelins [“Ravelin” – fr. a frontal auxiliary structure on the side of or in front of a fortification” and a court-in [“Courtine” – fr. a fortification between two bastions”] erected on the left. The fortified structures, casemates, [“Casemate” – fr. overland and underground military structures built of solid material”] that may be seen today are interconnected by an underground gallery, where the ammunition for the respective guns was stored and extra forces could be provided.
 
Construction of the ample structures of the batteries was finished by August 1903 when the Tsar Nicholas II arrived to Liepaja. A special train was equipped for him to run along the internal railway line of the new fortress. The Tsar was sitting on an open platform, together with his courtiers and the officers of the Russian Headquarters, receiving the solemn parades of the batteries. Battery No. 1 where 30 persons were engaged in servicing each of the guns was primary stand and the first one to visit during the Tsar’s stay.
 
The fortifications of Battery Nr. 1 were only once involved in hostilities that was on 4 and 14 November 1919 when the Russian – German troops, the so called Bermontians, mounted an attack towards the defenders of the Latvian Independence along the Šķēdes Road. The assault was beaten off requiring painful losses within the defenders’ ranks. 
 
Battery Nr. 1 Fortifications Tunnels;
 
Battery Nr. 1 Fortifications Tunnels is a set of tunnels that run underground between one battery to another one. These tunnels are a favorite excursion of not only locates, but visitors to Liepaja. It is not recommend that one not explore these tunnels with out a local guide.
 
Redans Fortifications; 
 
Redans Fortifications is located at 14. novembra bulvāris 82/86, and is a set of inter fortifications.
 
Battery Nr. 3 Fortifications; 
 
Battery Nr. 3 Fortifications was a set of coastal fortifications located at Krasta iela 12 and the Baltic coast line. The majority of the fortifications have been destroyed, but there is still a few that are still intact. 
 
Lunette Fortifications; 
 
Lunette Fortifications is located at 14. novembra bulvāris 54, and is a set of inter fortifications.
 
Fortification Ruins in The Green Grove; 
 
Fortification Ruins in The Green Grove is located at Grīzupes iela 37, and is a monument to Russian General who was killed during the first part of World War II. 
 
During the battle of Liepaja in 1941, this bunker served as headquarters of the commander of the 67th Infantry Division, Soviet General Major N.A. Dedaeva. He fell here on 25 June 1941. A part of the bunker today is now used as a memorial to the fallen commander.
 
Soviet General Major N.A. Dedaeva "7.11.1897-25.6.1941", is buried in the Russian War Cemetery located in Liepaja, Latvia in an individual grave.
 
Middle Fortifications;
 
Middle Fortifications is located at 14. novembra bulvāris 40, and is a set of inter fortifications.
 
Eastern Fortifications; 
 
Eastern Fortifications is located at Brīvības iela 180, and is a set of inter fortifications.
 
Battery Nr. 6 Fortifications; 
 
Battery Nr. 6 Fortifications was a set of coastal fortifications located at Zvejnieku iela 2/4, and are now located on private property, but can be gotten to by going through the woods from Zvejnieku iela. These bunkers are intact, but some of the entrances are bricked up while others have a iron gate blocking the entrances. This was done during the Soviet Union era. The underground entrances are also blocked up. The gun emplacements on the left half have been filled in. The gun emplacements on the right half between each bunker still have the concrete mounts still intact.
 
Battery Nr. 6 Fortifications Ammunition Powder Magazine Bunkers; 
 
Battery Nr. 6 Fortifications Ammunition Powder Magazines Bunkers are located on private property and are used for storage. The outer bunker doors are still intact as they were during the time they were built. 
 
South Fortifications; 
 
South Fortifications are located at Klaipēdas iela 85, and are a series of separate larger  bunkers covering a large area with a moot around them on three sides. One can explore the interior of a majority of these bunkers. Two of the fortifications have tunnels connecting the bunkers.
 
Also located at the South Fortification on a hill looking out toward the Baltic Sea is a former German Bunker that is still intact today. It sets on top of the highest point of land that is not occupied by any of the Russian era Fortifications and Bunkers. 
 
South Fortifications Tunnels; 
 
South Fortifications Tunnels where one can go back in time and experience what the Tsar's troops experiences by explore the interior of a majority of these bunkers and tunnels. Two of the fortifications have tunnels connecting the bunkers.
 
Russian Tsar’s era Inter Fortifications Powder Magazine Bunkers; 
 
Inter Fortifications Powder Magazine Bunkers is located at 14. novembra bulvāris 17, which is another remnants of Russian Tsar’s Inter Fortifications Powder Magazine Bunkers.
 
Russian Tsar’s era Small Ammunition Powder Magazine Bunker;
 
Russian Tsar’s Small Ammunition Powder Magazine Bunker is located north of Liepaja and Karosta and is located at Artilērijas iela 2A, which is located deep in a wooden area. One can explore the interior of this Small Ammunition Powder Magazine Bunker.
 
Russian Tsar’s era Large Ammunition Powder Magazine Bunkers; 
 
Russian Tsar’s Large Ammunition Powder Magazine Bunkers is located north of Liepaja and Karosta and is located at Laboratorijas iela 5, which is located deep in a wooden area. One can explore the interior of this Large Powder Magazine Bunkers.
 
Fortification and Tunnels Safety Information:
 
One has to remember, that these fortifications and tunnels do not have any light in them. Once one enter the tunnel, and go very far one will become in total darkness and can very easy become lost. This is the reason why if one wants to explore any of these tunnels, it is recommended that one only do so with a local guide and have the correct equipment before doing so. Again remember once you enter these fortifications and tunnels and go very deep your mobile phone will no longer work.
 
Again it is highly recommended that you have a local guide while exploring these fortification bunkers and these tunnels. For these local guides are highly trained and know the area and these tunnels and bunkers. It is also recommended that you not explore these fortifications and tunnels alone, for some of these tunnels have water in them as well as they are quite dark and a wrong step you could slip and fall and get hurt. Also some of these tunnels have wells in them and a wrong step you could slip and fall into to one of these wells. You could lie there for quite awhile before anyone would find you. Also some of the other fortification bunkers are also quite dark inside and the same thing could happen to you, you could slip and fall and lie there before anyone would find you. The inter fortifications are not tourist attraction, so they are not maintained and the paths leading from one to the other can be quite hard and dangerous getting from one to the other.
 
It is also recommended that you have a local guide before exploring any of the Russian Tsar’s Fortifications Powder Magazine Bunkers. For once you are inside one of them and if you get into trouble your mobile phone will not work and since they are not tourist attractions you maybe there for awhile before anyone would find you. 
 
Again remember that mobile phones won’t work inside some of these fortifications tunnels and some of the bunkers as well as the Russian Tsar’s Fortifications Powder Magazine Bunkers. 
 
10. Liepaja Russian Tsar's era Karosta Naval Port;
 
Karosta Northern Breakwater – ANNO 1893 is located at Katedrāles iela 7/13; 
 
This hydro technical construction is closely connected with building Liepaja Naval Fortress and Naval Port construction and it is a very significant part of it.
 
The authors of breakwater’s project are Russian engineers S. Boreisha, M. Maksimovich and engineer Colonel I. A. McDonald. The technical supervisors were engineer Captain V. Vselov and N. Korsakevic. It cost 2.88 millions Russian Rubles to build the breakwater. It is 1800 meters long “including solid head” and 7.35 meters wide. The building of The Northern Breakwater began on 3 March 1891 “foundation-stone was set on 16 August” and it was completed on 31 October 1893. The head of this breakwater is made from 21 meters long and 12.5 meters wide platform made as a position for cannons. Further on there are 265 meter wide Northern Sea Gate of Liepaja Port.
 
On 12 August 1893, the 2/3 thirds of the breakwater were completed when Tsar of Russia Alexander III came to Liepaja. That was his last journey because of his death on 1 November 1894. Using newly constructed building here happened flourish of trumpets of Liepaja Naval Fortress and Baltic Fleet Base. 7, 11 and 36 ton concrete solids were made in the concrete factory next to the breakwater. A special hole was made in one of these concrete solids and there was placed in a big silver memorial plank, golden, silver and cuprous Russian Imperial coins made in 1893 and a special message. In a special cylinder Tsar placed personal standard and flag of the country. After that everyone symbolically bricked up the hole with trowel considering social and state standing. Later on English block crane :Titan” which was also used in construction of the Northerner Breakwater delivered solid till the end of the breakwater and drowned it in to the sea while the workers were hurrying.
 
It was the first time in the history of building such objects in Russia when wittingly was used concrete solids with irregular shape as a base for construction in the sea, while making hydro technical building of Liepaja Port at the end of the 19th century. This technology still ensures stability of the Northern Breakwater. There were concrete trapeziums placed next to the northern side of breakwater to reduce impact. Today they are replaced with tridents.
 
During the Soviet Union second occupation, these breakwater were closed to the civilians residents and had a military post and barracks located on the road that leads to the breakwater. It also had an observation tower that looked out to the Baltic Sea. This area and its beaches were heavily patrolled with heavily armed guards and used dogs also. The Soviet Union Military was good at setting out guard posts at any part of Liepaja that would lead to water. 
 
Karosta Canal and its Breakwaters – ANNO 1894-1901 is located at Oskara Kalpaka iela 125;
 
The Canal of the Liepaja Naval Port is a hydro technical construction that plays the key role in its life. It connects the internal roads, the shipyard and the depot basin of the naval ships. The plan of the Canal was drawn up by Russian military engineers P. Boreisha “1859-?”, S. Maksimovitch “1861-?”, S. Redko, V. Veselov and by the civil engineer F. Edelheim “1949-1921”. Construction was carried out under superintendence of the Chief Contractor I. A. MacDonald “1850-1906 and this deputy I. Korsakevitch “1849-?”.
 
In May 1894, the construction works began and was completed in 1901. Floating ground suckers, steam dredges were widely used. The biggest ones, “Kronshtadt” and Saint Petersburg”, were built in France “Marsseilles” and their capacity was 60 cubic fathoms “271.m3” per hour.
 
Before the Canal was spanned with the swing-bridge a steam ferry plied between the two banks “see the decent on the right from the bridge”. In the northeastern part of the Canal, a basin for ships and submarines was arranged. It comprised two dry docks and a floating dock. All of them still operate today as a part of the Liepaja Shipyard “Tosmare”. On the opposite side of the Canal a heavy oil base and coal sites were erected. Construction of these structure units were carried out simultaneously with the Canal erection, as part of a complex plan. All this was designed for a Russian Submarine Base including a storehouse for naval mines. Later in 1932, the Liepaja Sugar Plant was built in the area making use of some of these naval structure units.
 
The diggers found enormous amounts of dolomite rock, therefore the direction of Karosta Canal is slightly turned to the right from the East direction which was planned at the beginning. The Canal is 3.5 km long and its width is 150 meters at the head and 250 meters at the eastern end. The average depth of the canal-bed is 9 meters. The project for the Canal and reservoir was to locate here 96 Battleships and 50 Carriers, almost all of the Russian Baltic Fleet.
 
The breakwaters at the Canal entrance were also erected within the united construction plan. The length of the Northern Breakwater is 358.2 meters and of the southern 507.6 meters. At first, while the canal dredging was going on, the breakwaters were used as interim harbor piers. People called them “the New Holland”. Stone blocks from Finland, bricks from the Lox Brickyards in Estonia, cement barrels from Germany, wood and construction equipment were discharged here. When the construction of the Canal was completed the breakwaters became merely walls built out into the sea to protect the shore and the canal entrance of sand silts and the front harbor’s heavy waves. 
 
Karosta Naval Port Manege – ANNO 1904 is located at Zemgales iela 15;
 
The building was erected from 1903 until 1904 and it is a part of a technological complex including also the boiler house, the electric station and the Small Gymnastics Manege “Devastated in 1997”.
 
The author is unknown. The building had a light roof of riveted metal constructions and a tin-plated lining. To let the light into the large hall, windows were produced and glass tiles installed in the roof ceiling. The interior of the hall was a modest one, a folding stage and portable chairs, a floor of pressed sawdust. On the East side there is a concrete plinth visible, this was a place for small Orthodox Manege Church with two entrances.
 
Every Sunday before World War I, performances of cavalry and artillery horses, as well as of the sport horses of the senior officers were arranged, also competitions in nimbleness of the horsemen took place. During the weeks, the hall was adapted to the sailors’ needs for gymnastics exercise.
 
As the hall could hold a large number of people, official meals for the garrison sailors were hosted here too.
 
In line with the celebrating festivities of the 300 years of the Romanovs’ Dynasty’s resigning over the whole Russia Empire over the period from 13 January to 26 April 1913 the Liepaja Garrison, too, gave a party in the two Officers’ Conventions House. In the same time, on 21 February 1913, the sailors got the festive dinner for 4000 persons in the Manege. The Manege building, suffered severely from the World War II hostilities, it burnt out and the metal constructions of the roof was ruined. The USSR occupation troops made use of the Manege as a convenient shelter and depot for the motor battalion, with extra enclosed ought quality walls, walling up architectonically valuable window aisles.
 
Karosta Water Tower – ANNO 1905 is located at Ģenerāļa Baloža iela 27;
 
Karosta Water Tower which is encircled by apartment buildings, some of which are abandoned, the Tosmare Water Tower, which was built in 1905 in a pseudo-Gothic style and is made of red bricks. It is 37 meters "121.39 feet" high. Steam pumps were once used to pump underground water from artesian wells into the tower "the pumps have survived to this day". Water was delivered three times a day to smaller reservoirs to surrounding houses of the residents of Karosta. The tower is no longer used for its original purpose, however, the tower can be seen from the outside at any time.
 
Karosta Naval Port was a self contained and self supporting Naval Base. It had its own Power Plant that provided electric to the entire Naval Port and the Water Tower was also part of this self supporting designs. Even though the water tower is no longer in use, it is still a marvel of construction and operation during its time it was in use that is why it is a sight well worth to see. I am not sure if one can make arrangements to tour the inside, one needs to ask your guide.
 
Karosta Station of Homing Pigeons – ANNO 1900 is located at Pulkveža Brieža iela 6; 
 
The station was built from 1899 until 1900. It was intended for 450 homing pigeons. Earlier by 1896, another pigeon station was built in the fortress that was intended for 750 liaison pigeons. It was disposed in the northern end of the present Atmodas Avenue, behind the Mortar Coastal Battery of Artillery Cannon No. 3. However, it has not remained to this day.
 
The architect of the Homing Pigeon Station is unknown as of today. The construction costs were 10.6 thousand Russian Rubles.
 
By a resolution of the Russian Navy Ministry of 24 January 1900 the annual budget and list of staff members were approved, 8 military personal served at the Homing Pigeon Station. There is a tale about the head of the Station who spent for selfish purposes the money that had been earmarked for the pigeons’ nutriment, 1.29 Russian Rubles per bird annually. Before World War I, the Homing Pigeon Station of the Liepaja Naval Port and fortress used to arrange specific maneuvers annually to train the pigeons in quick and exact post deliveries to the addressee. It is known, for example, that the maneuvers of 1907 were a great success, returned 90% of the pigeons that had been taken to Copenhagen.
 
The Pigeon Station was rebuilt many times and today it is a private home.
 
Karosta Navy Officers’ Conventions – ANNO 1907 is located at Atmodas bulvāris 9; 
Please Note : This building and its complex of buildings is now located inside a fenced in and restricted area and is no longer accessible to the general public. Even photographing it from the street side of fence line area is STRICYLY PROHIBITED by order of the Latvian Self-Defense Forces.
The first house ornamented with eclectic front was erected in 1895 and it was the Chief Commander’s Headquarters. During the period of 1909-1912, A. V. Kolchak “1874-1920” lived in this house. He was a commanding officer of the Baltic Fleet Mine Division, later on during the Russian Civil War, :1917-1920” White Guard’s Commanding Officer. Because of him this house is also known as “Kolčak’s House”. The admiral, surrounded by senior officers and all sitting in comfortable arm-chairs, from a specially arranged convenient oversight area on the roof of the Headquarters, used to observe the naval ships maneuvering in the roads and following the commander’s orders and light signals of the signal system operator. At the same time, this palace like building till 1908 was also the provisional premises of the navy officers’ conventions and the Navy Headquarters.
 
There is a State importance architectural monument in the back of the courtyard, Navy Officers’ Convention building or Officers’ Palace. The plan of the Officers’ Palace was drawn up by the Saint Petersburg’s architect S. Galyenzovsky “1870-1917”, the engineering arrangements were produced by J. Blyiznyansky “1867- ?”. The whole set of drawings for construction of the palace and other houses were approved on 21 April 1896. The foundation stone of the Palace was laid in March 1898. Then construction operations were blocked over “1901-1903. Finally, the approval resolution was passed on 5 July 1907 when the statement of acceptance was signed.
 
0.62 Million Russian Rubles were invested into construction of the Officers’ Palace. The perimeter of the foundation is 533.58 meters, height of the building 42.49 meters. And the mentioned oversight area on the roof of the Palace is 3700 m2. The building was designed to comprise 30 rooms including library with reading room, aquarium hall, restaurant with the summer balcony and balcony for the orchestra. The orders from the kitchen to the restaurant were delivered by electrical elevator. 
 
A splendid opening Gala Party in the Palace was arranged at the very end of 1907, on 27 December. The beginning of this party was scheduled at 21:00hrs and the first guests were welcomed by the Palace seniors and party organizers and Conta-Admiral I. Grigorovich “1853-1930”, the Commander of the Alexander III Naval Port of Liepaja. The city councilors, traders and producers, the major ship owners and other prominent persons were invited. Among the guests, there were also the Governor of Kurzeme, the Commandant of the Liepaja Naval Fortress, a number of senior officials from the capital of the Russian Empire Saint Petersburg; from the Ministry of Communications and Naval Affairs, from the army and navy general staff and as a Crown of the Prominences, the members of the Tsar’s Court. The ladies received flowers, the dance program and the Russian Saint Andrew flag colors ribbon with a special bronze badge attached in honor of the opening celebration. The metropolis as well as the local journalists reported that the Gala Party had been great, a number of new faces and marvelous dresses of ladies could be sighted.
 
The house of the Navy Officers’ Conventions is a grand building shaped in the Slav P-form (П) and imitating the architectural style of suburb palace complexes in Saint Petersburg. The house exterior is perfected by adding columns, plentiful plastic decors with the Russian weapon glory motifs and art nouveau elements. The composition of the building is crowned with a mighty spherical cupola covering overhead the central hall. Due to the exterior and interior architecture of the Officers’ Palace, exactly selected location and the composition of a unified ensemble it surely ranks among the most prominent public building throughout Liepaja and Latvia and in list of national heritage.
 
The exterior and interior of the house was made from 8 December 1904 to 17 November 1906 by the Russian artist N. Rubtsov and the French sculptor Charles de Grange “Charles Desgange”. Furniture was produced by the R. Berman’s furniture producers in Saint Petersburg. The Russian Ministry of Naval Affairs ordered 3 pictures at 6.5 thousand rubles for the Palace they were the portraits of the Tsars, Alexander III and Nicholas II and the oval of the Grand Duke, the Navy Admiral General Aleksey. These art pieces were so big that they were brought from Saint Petersburg to Liepaja by ship, as they could not be placed into a rail carriage even without the frames.
 
Interior decoration order was made to the French sculptor Charles de Grange by the command of the Grand Duke, General Admiral Aleksey. The plan envisaged to carry out decoration of the vestibule, the central staircase, the grand hall and one of the guests’ rooms in the style of Louis XVI, while the other guests’ room, the buffet and the dining room were to be performed a la modern. The interior paintings were different in the two guests’ room; the color was marine blue in the one to the left from the grand hall; these were the ladies’ apartments, while the room beside the restaurant was in green and that was the gentleman’s’ smoke room. The central hall was used to arrange parties, to deliver lectures, to hold official convention with a big amount of participating officers. There was no particular stage in the hall but it was mounted as soon as required. Together with the mass of folding chairs the stage was stored in a specially erected one-story outbuilding within the house complex of the Palace.
 
The main stairs are made of Crimea marble. These are a masterpiece of the stonecutter Ernst Vernetti from Odessa. The backyard exit stairs were made of sawn Estonian grey dolomite.
 
A unique heating system was used in the palace; the warm air from the heated water reservoirs in the basement circulated over all of the rooms through special shafts. The sophisticated was produced by a Saint Petersburg metal plant. The constructed palace complex included also land-tennis court, living extensions for the seasonal workers and two-story houses with flats for the palace cashier, librarian, housekeeper and rooms for the officers on mission. In the northern part of the complex, there was a low park a la Versailles, a paved road to the Tsar’s yacht pier, teashop and an ice cellar. From the backyard’s three sides, the complex was enclosed by a subtly ornamented chiseled fence with artistic cut monograms of the Tsar Alexander III.
 
The front of the building is turned towards the sea. The street parallel to the colonnade of the façade used to be the major street of the Naval Port, the Admirals’ street, and it was paved with stone cut in Finland.
 
Upon beginning of World War I the huge library of charts and books of the Palace was evacuated to Russia, in Moscow and Petrograd. So were the chandeliers, the contents of the wine cellar and part of the furniture. From May 1915 till March 1919, a German war hospital and recreation space for German officers were, located there in the palace. Then under the following Latvian government, the palace complex was not managed by anyone till 1927. 
 
In 1928, the Latvian Red Cross organization signed a lease treaty with the Warfare Department of Latvia for 25 years and began to arrange a sanatorium of bone tuberculosis there. Reconstruction was conducted by A. Klinklavs, an architect from Riga. The jobs didn’t include more, though, than simple adapting of the horse stables, hothouses and other household buildings. Planting and lawn treatment was made in the park and all over the territory up to the former yacht harbor. 14 Lilac sorts were put into ground under the gardener P. Zeidak’s guidance. When reconstruction was over the whole Bone Tuberculosis Sanatorium of the Latvian Red Cross was brought to Liepaja from the previous place in Riga’s seaside, Asari. Finally to disclose the historical background of the Navy Officers’ Conventions, one should mention that most of the time it was a Soviet Navy Hospital. This was from the eve of World War II in 1939, when the Latvian Red Cross Sanatorium had to vacate the house for the Soviets and over a number of years after the War till May 1994 when the last persons of the neighboring country’s troops left Liepaja in conformity with the interstate agreements.

Today it stands vacant and in very poor condition and in total disrepair. When we were there in August 2012, we could walk around it, but could not go inside because of the condition it is in and is considered unsafe. They were working on repairing the balcony that is over the front entrance way, but if they are going to restore it I am unsure. For the escort we had didn't talk a whole lot other then tell us what we could photograph and what we couldn't. I have seen earlier photographs of the building and it interior and it once was quite elegance. 
 
Karosta House of Two Admirals – ANNO 1899 is located at Katedrales iela 2;
 
The plans of the building were drawn up by the Russian architects K. Kopishtshev, N. Vinidiktov, S. Kovalyov. The drawings of architectural and engineering solutions were approved in 1 April 1896 in Saint Petersburg. Construction was carried out over 1897-1899. From the beginning, the building was intended for the needs of the Tsar and his family members. The construction costs were 92.2 thousand Russian Rubles. The interior decoration is highly modest while the exterior is florid including plastering panels, faun figures of the Greek-Roman myths, flower vases and urns. There were two spacious balconies on the first floor, one at each end, with high decorated exterior barriers. These had been constructed this way to prevent from draughts as the balconies were the place where the adjutants laid lunch or served the afternoon tea from the silver samovars for officers. In the backyard of the building, there was a complex of one-story outhouses of red and yellow bricks with living rooms for the adjutants and valets of the Headquarters. These were removed recently during 1994-1997. 
 
In May 1901 and August 1903, there were two short-term visits of the Russian Tsar Nicholas II with his family members and court people.
 
The house bears the name of Two Admirals” because of the two persons; the Fortress Commandant and the Naval Port Commander who were both officers of the admiral rank and were most often met here. 
 
In 1913, both storey’s of the building were reconstructed and adjusted for the Headquarters of the Liepaja Naval Base Aviation Corps and apartments for the senior officers. During this period the greatest changes are connected with rebuilding at eastern corner i.e. left wing. In time of the Latvian Government over the 1920s and 1930s, the building became the headquarters of the Liepaja Garrison, as there were the Liepaja and Ventspils Infantry Regiments “Red Insignia”, the Artillery Squadron of Kurzeme “Blue Insignia”, the Cavalry “Yellow Insignia” the Gunnery Laboratory “Black Insignia: and Marine and Pilot Units stationed in Liepaja.
 
During 1940-1941, the Headquarters of the 67th Riflemen’s Division of the Soviet Army was located here. The division commander was the Major General N. A. Dedayev who was wounded by a mine explosion at the northern redoubt of the Middle Fort during the first days of defense of Liepaja against the Hitler’s troops on June 1941. He died on 27 June of the same year in the Central Navy Hospital. Major General N. A. Dedayev is interned in the Liepaja Soviet Union Military Cemetery located in the southern part of Liepaja and the south end of Centralie Cemetery “Centrālie kapsēta” – Lat: N56.4827478, Lon: E021.0073684, Klaipēdas iela 83, There is also a Monument to Major General N. Dedayev located at Fortification Ruins in The Green Grove, Lat: N56.54576, Lon: E021.08051, Grīzupes iela 37,
 
67th Riflemen’s Division of the Soviet Army – from 10 October 1942 to August 1945 the end of the war was guarding the coast of the Baltic States from Tallinn Estonia to the South.
 
The USSR Navy units had their headquarters in this house too. It was only in May 1994 that the Russian Federation “the former Soviet” Army troops left the house.
 
Karosta Kalpak’s Bridge and Karosta Canal – ANNO 1906 is located at Oskara Kalpaka iela;
 
The swing bridge in Karosta, is one of the oldest in Liepaja is a prominent sample of engineering of the early 20th century.
 
In 1903, the designing of the Bridge began in Sankt-Petersburg Company of metal factory after French engineer Alexander Gustav Eifel “1832-1923 drawings. The sum of projections resulted in 0.49 million Russian Rubles including design and construction “qualified worker’s reward per 10 hour working day was, 1.58 Rubles”. The electric motor and the swing mechanisms were manufactured in Belgium while the metal constructions were brought from Russia, Bryansk. The uprights of the bridge were laid in 1904.
 
In the summer of 1906, the whole construction could be proved. At first the bridge was loaded with 8 tram coaches and other units, then on 11 August, carts and field cannons with crews and soldiers marching in step were allow to cross the bridge.
 
On 19 August 1906, the bridge was solemnly consecrated by the priest of the Saint Nicholas Maritime Cathedral.
 
Lighting to the bridge was produced by 8 decorative lantern poles forged in iron and bearing 2 lamps each. Today, when the bridge is under reconstruction, there is a plan to renovate the details as well. 20 years later, in 1926, an accident with the Norwegian tanker “Narte” led to damage to the props, the swing mechanisms and a span section of the bridge. It took 2 years to resume traffic across the bridge again. The repairs were carried out at the workshops of the Naval Port while the spare parts were made in Poland. About one half of the total losses were reimbursed by the culprit, the captain and the insurers, the “Lloyd’s of London”. In October 1928 the traffic over the bridge started again. But on 12 July 2006, the northern part of the bridge was damaged by tank ship “Anna”, sailing under Georgian flag. Today the bridge is again in use.
 
Brief technical description of the construction; its length is 132.28 meters the utmost load capacity is 240t the height above the water is 8.32 meters. The central span section is 64 meters long. The props have been laid 15 meters into the ground. When a vessel is passing through the canal, the 2 similar girders of the bridge are turned apart by 90°. It takes about 4-5 minutes to apply the operation by means of an electric motor or a windless.
 
People say, it was in the summer of 1936 when a daring pilot pledged to give an evidence of his skills and glided under the arch of a closed bridge by a dihedral plane in presence of the amazed public. The result of the success, through, was the deduction in his lieutenant’s rank. 
 
Karosta Naval Port Guardhouse – ANNO 1904 is located at Invalīdu iela 4; 
 
This two story building built from red bricks is a former Navy Hospital Complex, which was built during period 1896-1904. From July 1905, this place was used as a short time disciplinary penalty place for navy sailors and non-commissioned officers, when there was no other place for the arrested rebellions. In large quantities, here were sailors also from other Baltic fleet commands in 1906 and 1908.
Please Note: Contrary to what some people have said or written, this building from day one, never was a Navy Hospital Complex, but was designed as a disciplinary penalty, which was used during the Russian Tsar time, the Soviet Union Military during its first occupation, then by the Nazi Army, and then again by the Soviet Union during the second occupation and then finally by the Latvian Military. The only part that resembles a hospital is a small tile floor section that is located just before entering the corridor that leads to the holding cells. The former Navy Hospital Complex was located in the Navy Officers' Conventions before it was moved to another location! 
Since the first days of maintenance the house became a gloomy place for breaking down people’s fortunes and repressing free spirit. 
 
There are 69 rooms in the guardhouse, 39 of them are prisoners’’ cells, single seated and common. In the pre-World War I time the Territory of the Guardhouse was larger, as it encompassed marching sites, penalty sentries, instruments and appliance for physical exercise, labor and disparagement. The house was surrounded by a high forged metal fence, the fragments of which may be still seen at the small entrance gate. 
 
During the 20 years of the first Latvian Republic and over the Soviet time too, the Guardhouse was the place of a short-term disciplinary punishment. The worst and the most bloody time for the Guardhouse of the Liepaja Naval Port was that of the Nazi occupation years during World War II. From June 1944 to May 1945, that was the place of the Nazi Court Martial consisting of three officers. Death penalty by shooting was the only sentence of the court, whether towards trespassers against army and navy discipline, deserters of the Latvian Legion or the civilians who were suspected for being the Red Army’s spies. The doomed were kept in the first floor wards from the yard side and special red signs were attached to the respective door.
 
By the very date of the Nazis’ surrender on 8 May 1945, the victims were buried in a mass graveyard nearby. The prisoners were forced to dig graves for themselves. It is estimated that the burial-ground contains the remains of about 90 victims. In 1957, the place was evened and a football ground for the sailors was arranged there.
 
The other victims, mostly civilians, were killed by a shot in the back of their heads and buried in random places in the nearby pine growth on the left from the sand hill.
 
The Guardhouse has gained the fame of fearful tragedies and historical edification. In and of the cells, under the thick black paint, you may see the convicts’ scratched calendars, drawings, slogans, catchwords and messages. The very fresh ones may be viewed in the windowless ward, the punishment cell, where the especially disobedient servicemen were imprisoned. The prisoners day started at first light, allowed to toilet, since there was no, and there still to this day has no, plumbing of any kind in any of the cells, feed sometime of a growl breakfast then drilled unmercifully until it was time to eat again. At the end of the day, they were given a bucket and then relocked in their cells, which had only sample wood boards and a thin mat laying directly on the floor until the next day. A prisoner's day could run as long as 18 hours. They were there for reeducation and not for a vacation. A prisoner could end up imprisoned for just a simple thing as getting drunk to upsetting their sergeant or commander. Duty in the Soviet Union Army, especially for a conscript was unmercifully. One could be arrested, imprisoned, sent to a gulag, punishment camp to down right shot. [] 
 
From 1992 to 1997 the Guardhouse was used by the Latvian Navy. Then they revealed that were very strange and mysterious phenomena occurring in the place, the sound of footsteps, the bulbs that were unscrewing arbitrarily, inexplicable cases when closed cells were found open. And the worst of all were the surreal images that used to become visible in the corridors from time to time, sometimes in the shape of a young lady in a white dress, sometimes in the shape of a small white dog.
 
Karosta Saint Nicholas Maritime Cathedral – ANNO 1903 is located at Studentu rotas iela 7;
 
The Saint Nicholas Maritime Orthodox Cathedral is the visual and spiritual dominant of the whole Naval Port area. The author of the design was the Saint Petersburg’s architect, academician V. Kosyakov and he was assisted by the architect A. Viksel. The executive artist and the author of the mosaics was V. Frolov, the wood carvings and gilding of the iconostas were made by P. Abosimov. The paintings of the central and the right-side alter spheres were produced by F. Railyan and the frescoes of the left-side altar spheres were painted by M. Vasilyev. 
 
The construction cost were 0.53 million Russian Rubles, The Cathedral has been designed and erected in the style of the 17th century Russian Orthodox Churches with central and four side cupolas symbolizing Christ and Four Apostles. The central entrance with the two fold door of a filigree work resembles the gate of the Saint Sofia Cathedral in Kiev. Behind the front door there is another one, installed particularly to prevent the people in the church from draughts. The Finnish granite and sandstone were used in the exterior trimming; walls were brick laid of the Estonian yellow bricks. Subtle majolica “Windows” and mosaics add to the exterior. High above the western entrance, from the seaside, the Mosaic Iron of Christ, the Redeemer, is seen; beneath it, the icon of Saint Nicholas, the patron of seamen and travelers. The mosaic icons of the Virgin and Saint Alexander Nevsky were placed by the artist V. Frolov on the southern façade, of Christ, the Savior, on the eastern façade and of Saint Nicholas, the Miracle Worker and of Aleksey, the Russian Orthodox Church metropolitan, on the northern façade.
 
The Saint Nicholas Cathedral was designed for 1500 people.
 
The height of its cupola is 54 meters.
 
Drawing of the plans was started on 16 August 1899, when an agreement was signed between the chief construction od the Liepaja Naval Port I. A. Mac Donald and the academician V. Kosyakov of Saint Petersburg. Erection began in May 1901. On 4 June 1901, the Russian Tsar Nicholas Ii with his family members, court people and supreme officers took place in the solemn ceremony of construction of the foundation stone of the Cathedral. The walls were 12 meters high on that day. On 13 October 1902, the first bell was installed in the tower of the Cathedral. The first service in Saint Nicholas Cathedral and church consecration took place on 23 August 1903. Also in this ceremony, the Russian Tsar Nicholas II and his family and courtiers took place. In 1905, from Liepāja Naval Port to the Far East to Russian, Japanese War went Pacific Ocean Squadron II. In the Church, services for officers and sailors, they were praying for mariners’ fortune.
 
Upon the outbreak of World War I, numerous items were evacuated to Russia including the bell and icons and the values that had been left were pillaged by the German occupiers. During the 1920s and 1930s, under the Latvian Government, the Church was adapted to the needs of the Liepaja Garrison Lutherans.
 
Finally, upon conclusion of World War II, the Soviet Naval Base in Liepaja was made a secret territory and was closed to the public. So they established a sports hall, a cinema and the so-called “Red Corner”, a recreation and entertainment room, here in the former Cathedral for the needs of the sailors and soldiers. It was then that the sphere of the central cupola was bricked up in order to avoid the great acoustics and let the navy people listen to the films. The Cathedral does not have any more the marvelous mosaic floor of stone tiles that it used to have before, although the side altar wall-paintings are still under redecoration.
 
All the four facades of the Cathedral are of significant architectonic and artistic value. Their frontons contain reproductions of the canonized Saint of the Orthodox Church, as well as inscriptions in the Church Slav language and orthography.
The West façade central stairs: The Holy Christ Savior’s icon and text.
 
The East façade: The Virgin’s icon and text.
 
The South façade: The Virgin’s icon and Orthodox Church Saint Alexander Nevsky icon and text.
 
The North façade: Saint Nicholas Wonderworker’s icon and metropolitan’s Saint Aleksey’s icon and text, who was premier in Russia during the church building.
The memorial of an anchor that is located on the cathedral's grounds is dedicated to those sailors who were killed during The Russo-Japanese War "8 February 1904 – 5 September 1905" was "the first great war of the 20th century.
 
Liepaja Karosta Garnizona “kapsēta” Cemetery is located at Ģenerāļa Baloža iela 37B; 
 
This cemetery is located at the corner of Laboratorijas iela and Ģenerāļa Baloža iela in the northeast part of Karosta. Garnizona “kapsēta” Cemetery dates from the late 19th century to early 20th century. It is a public cemetery with not only civilians buried there, but also Latvian and Russian Soldiers are buried here both from World War I and World War II. In the center rear of the cemetery is a monument dedicated to the Soviet Soldiers who died during World War II. The main Liepaja Soviet Union World War II Military Cemetery is located in the south part of Liepaja Old Town at the south end of Centrālie “kapsēta”  Cemetery at Lat: N56.48062, Lon: E021.00903, Klaipedas iela 85, Liepaja, LV-3416. 
 
Also in this cemetery there are 11 Soviet Soldiers that are buried in a collective grave.
 
I relies that this epilog is longer then most epilogs are, but I wanted to cover again all the sights that the City of Liepaja has to offer and the history that Liepaja went through during these different periods of time. The more history of a town or city one can learn and pass on, the more interesting the town or city becomes. To much of a town's or cities history has become lost through time and can never be recovered, this can never happen. Once the writers of the history start dying off and their book become lost, that town or city history starts to fads into the past. One might say that hay we have museums that are filled with the town's or cities history, but I say that it only takes one misfortune and it can all go up in smoke to never be replaced again. Look at all the countries treasures that were lost during World War I and World War II. The countries historical treasures were looted by the invading armies sent back to their country and ended up being lost for ever. A prime example is the country of Latvia during World War II and the Soviet Union's first occupation then came the Nazi Germany's occupation of Latvia. Between these two countries Latvia lost all most all their historical treasures due to these occupations of these two countries. This is only one example what can happen to ones countries history and their treasures. Another example is during the first Soviet Union's occupation, all the churches and cathedrals bells were removed and supposedly for safe keep and shipped to the Soviet Union, well guess what these bells up and disappeared for ever and some of these bells dated back to the 15th and 16th century, historical bells, lost for ever. During the Soviet Union second occupation, the local commissars and party members went on a book burning spree. If it didn't fit into Stalin's Soviet Union Marxist–Lenin Socialist Communist theory ideology, they burned them. Lost for ever. As to Latvia's lost historical treasures, the last time I checked, which was September 2012, with Latvia's Historical Society they have never been recovered to this day. Lost for ever! 
 
This is why I say; For the history of ones country, town or city is their life blood of their founding and being, lose your history and it is lost for ever! 
 
"TheCeļotājs"
 
 
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Revised: 06/28/2013 – 17:18:56